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Comment: It’s time for the media to change the record on trans healthcare

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  1. I’d say a change isn’t just needed in how the media reports trans healthcare, but how it reports trans topics entirely. While even Pink News was quick to report about Suzanne Moore, if you weren’t a New Statesman reader, this story might’ve vanished into the ether.

    1. Sorry Sarah. I accidentally clicked the thumbs down when I wanted to click the thumbs up.

  2. ...Paddyswurds 11 Jan 2013, 6:47pm

    Another story of the trans community whining about something and blaming everyone else…. Are these people ever happy?

    1. Sarah Brown 11 Jan 2013, 6:52pm

      People generally aren’t terribly happy about A&E doctors leaving them to bleed out, being called “abominations”, genital groping and suchlike. One can be happy regardless, but it’s a bit of an uphill struggle, you know?

    2. …Paddyswurds
      Such desperate trolling ignorance.

    3. Why do you hate those who are trans so much?

      1. ...Paddyswurds 14 Jan 2013, 5:38pm

        I hate no one. I, like quite a lot of people reading this and other Gay sites am just fed up listening and reading their constant whining. That is the only time one hears from these unhappy people….. They are their own worst enemy….

  3. Sarah darling, talk less about the media and more about education. Write about yourself, and how you have decreased the chances of trans people to get an education, and make them pay for the one you have.

    1. Sarah Brown 11 Jan 2013, 8:17pm

      Don’t use an attempt to highlight and spread awareness about systemic abuse against trans people in medicine to try and score political points. This is causing significant harm to lots of people and the last thing we need is to be told we shouldn’t be talking about it.

      1. I haven’t told you shouldn’t be talking about it, have I Sarah? I just told you should talk less about it and more about education, and specifically education for trans people. You cannot hide behind your cloud of dust for too long. One day the dust will settle, and people will see who you really are, and what you have being doing.

        1. Sarah Brown 11 Jan 2013, 9:53pm

          I’m very transparent about who I am and what I get up to. Who are you?

          1. If you are as transparent as you say you are, write an article about how you got the degrees you have, particularly how they were financed. I’m sure other trans people will find it very amusing to know how you are making them pay for your academic life, while making their chances of getting an education more difficult.

          2. Sarah Brown 12 Jan 2013, 7:28am

            I went to university for three years as an undergraduate, funded in the standard way for the time (grants plus student loans, which I’ve since repaid) twenty one years ago. I left with a second class honours degree in computer science. None of this has any bearing on whether I sold be talking about how trans people are receiving appalling treatment at the hands of the medical community.

            Is your serious position that nobody can highlight abuse against trans people if they went to university, or would you simply rather nobody highlighted abuse against trans people? I’ve been entirely clear about my motivation and interest here. You haven’t said anything about yours.

          3. Sarah, I’m not a public political figure and I’ve never told you shouldn’t highlight abuses. I told you should write more about education. Write an article to inspire other trans people to get an education. That’s how they won’t be run over by people who have nothing but a political interest in them. Now, the fact that the party you support has screwed up their chances of getting one is only a minor detail of course. Are you on a political payroll?

        2. Hun if we talked any less about trans healthcare we’d actually end sucking all available discussion on the subject into some sort of negative discussion blackhole…

  4. H.V. Tiller 11 Jan 2013, 8:58pm

    Please- listen to the experts ! Namely transgender and transsexual persons. Please !

  5. I think she has a good point here. The double standards in the media is self-evident but papers wanna make money so trans people are easy pikings. But not for long. It’s up to you how long the bullying will last.

    1. Sadly it’s not we’ve been trying to stop it for decades. It up to the LGB community to remember it’s trans siblings and remember the fact we helped fight for LGB liberation and now might be a good time to return the favour. It’s up to the media to stop picking on anything it doesn’t understand. It’s up to the medical community to stop treating us all like ignorant children and it’s to every to leave us to live our lives in peace! We’re already doing everything we can.

  6. Is there also a problem with the way medical professionals are educated and trained, or are the subjects of the tweets mostly older people? I mean, I would have guessed that nowadays you would get at least some exposure to the needs of trans and intersex people on the way to getting a medical degree, rather than relying on stuff you read in the Sun?

    If doctors can be influenced so easily by the mainstream media, then it makes the other misguided healthcare-related crusades (such as the Daily Mail’s scaremongering about palliative care, and the Sun’s campaign to lower the cervical cancer screening age) even more worrying.

  7. This is all very true and people should be paying attention to this. It’s sad though that the voices of the 98% of trans people who say the medical system is broken are ignored in favour of the 2% of regretters who are sensationalised for the media and used as an excuse as to why we should be denied healthcare altogether, which leads to healthcare professionals getting in a tizzy and then tightening their guidelines and adding even more hoops for trans people wanting healthcare to have to jump through, making it an even harder and more stressful process. It’s a mess and it needs to be sorted out by trans people, for trans people, not by and for cisgender gatekeepers and certainly not for the media.

  8. Bad example saying a hand is as important to ones sense of identity and gender as a penis or vagina or breasts etc – but I agree with Sarah’s points. Trans people are treated appallingly by the media it seems.

    1. Sarah Brown 12 Jan 2013, 3:44pm

      My hand has nothing to do with my sense of gender. I think you misunderstood my example. I am actually rather concerned about the potential future amputation of some of my fingers.

    2. Sarah Brown 12 Jan 2013, 3:45pm

      And it’s not as if I have a long list of body parts that I’ve had surgery on on the basis of misdiagnosis and regret. Um, just the hand really.

    3. melnificent 12 Jan 2013, 4:07pm

      I’m a gamer and losing a finger would cause a fundamental change in my sense of identity as I would suddenly lose the ability to play most games.
      Climbing (another big part of my life) might be out depending on which fingers which again would cost me my sense of identity.
      Programming and writing would take a major hit as well. Affecting my employability, and work is another part of a persons identity
      All that lose of identity a from losing a finger.

      So comparing the two is valid.

      1. SixAgileFingers 12 Jan 2013, 7:06pm

        I’m a gamer too. I lost some use of the fingers on my left ulnar nerve and it did have a minor impact on my playing. It also affected clutch control on a bike to the point where three years later I’m still working towards being roadworthy again.

        It hasn’t affected my identity much because I haven’t let it, but it might’ve.

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