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Video: Canadian TV ad campaign asks why ‘faggot’ is considered an acceptable word

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  1. Dave Ward 9 Jan 2013, 7:23pm

    I’m not a gay man, but the word ‘faggot’ is right up there with ‘nigger’ in my mind on the list of unacceptable words. I should say I’m not a black man, either, I guess.
    Before Hitler got his hands on the swastika, it was a completely acceptable symbol; it was even on some ancient Jewish pottery. But it’s not okay now, that’s certain.
    ‘Faggot’ was okay when it meant a cigarette or a bundle of wood, too. But once a word is absolutely associated with dripping hatred and abuse of specific people, it is no longer welcome in my vocabulary. Now if a Brit says “I’m going to light up a fag”, that’s okay. If Bubba Klan-boy says it, I’m notifying the authorities immediately.

  2. Word only have the power you give them. By reclaiming such words, they lose their power to insult. That being said, I don’t allow anyone to treat me being gay as somehow negative, regardless of the words they use.

    1. Really? Try reclaiming or try to re brand Holocaust or anti antisemitism to put a positive spin on them, the notion is absurd! A word used as a pejorative has power, it will always be used specifically and intentionally to hurt other segments of society because no matter how you re brand some word by their historic use and demeaning connotation are abusive.

      Reclamation of words by a self indulgent segments of the gay community has given the belief they are doing so for the benefit of others. There is no recognition given to the balance of the community who are offended by this action because the words very reference or use of the words whether they be geographically more offensive than others in no way change or eliminate the memories or experiences people have because they exist and will always be hurtful or distressing,

      Every day here on PN we commentators are outraged by pejoratives yet say it’s okay for the gay community to feel proud to use them because it’s reclaimed.

      .

      1. It comes down to a simple point – You’ve chosen to be upset by specific words, thus allowing others to control you – I, and many others, have not.

        1. I can certainly see your point of view! societal views of certain words have changed over time and there is merit to what your saying.

          I still disagree however! certain words by their very definitional are pejoratives that will always be used abusively. Perhaps with time and to a lessor degree in future as insight and political correctness influence change. Bigots and bully’s however won’t change, They will continue to use these words as they have for decades with willful and malicious intent. Reinvention does not give word power the magic ability not to be abusive or demean people. Try telling a person having the life kicked out of them whilst their attackers rain abuse on them “you have chosen to be offended by these words” I am sorry I don’t accept it. nor do I think the hundreds of today’s youth who chose suicide as an escape would see it from your perspective.

        2. It’s not just us personally, Ivan. It’s easier to not let words hurt you when you’re a confident adult, but what about LGBT teens growing up hearing such language?

          Homophobic language should be as unacceptable as racist language.

          1. I would not presume to tell someone’s who’s black they they should use the ‘n’ word it they want to. The same being said, if I choose to us any word to describe myself, it’s my business. As for youth, I think seeing strong/confident LGBT adults not allowing themselves to be perceived as lesser, does more than any indignation over a word.

  3. Instead of asking why the word ‘faggot’ is acceptable, shouldn’t we be asking why people ARE homophobic in the first place? Could it be that homophobes are simply closet cases and afriad anyone might ever accuse them of being gay? Therefore, they ‘protest too loudly’. The question to ask a homophobe is ‘Why do you have issues about homosexuality’? If someone is comfortable with who they are, they are not going to be homophobic. Only people with their own same-sex ‘issues’ are homophobic. There is no other reason.

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