A former Navy chaplain who was disgraced by the military for his role in a protest in 2006 has said that Republican politician Newt Gingrich is pandering to “homosexual sin” and tempted by the devil with his acceptance of same-sex marriage.

The Rev Gordon Klingenschmitt posted a video where he cites a Bible passage from Romans, Chapter 1, that states “homosexual acts are worthy of death.”

“It’s not like Newt is personally engaging in homosexual activity, but the Bible condemns him now because he takes pleasure in those that do that sort of thing,” the chaplain explained. “When the Bible condemns his endorsement of homosexual sin then he has become one of the sinners condemned by Romans, Chapter 1.”

Rev Klingenschmitt said that Mr Gingrich is tempted by “demonic voices” telling him: “Okay, it’s not really a sin. We ought to endorse this” in order to succeed in a possible future Republican primary race.

Although Mr Gingrich continues to state that marriage is between a man and a woman, the he suggested the Republicans could accept a distinction between a “marriage in a church from a legal document issued by the state” — the latter being acceptable for gay couples in his opinion.

In light of November’s decision of several US states to pass equal marriage measures, Mr Gringrich went on to say:

“The momentum is clearly now in the direction in finding some way to… accommodate and deal with reality. And the reality is going to be that in a number of American states — and it will be more after 2014 — gay relationships will be legal, period.”

He said: “I didn’t think that was inevitable 10 or 15 years ago, when we passed the Defense of Marriage Act.

“It didn’t seem at the time to be anything like as big a wave of change as we are now seeing.”
Mr Gingrich previously said the movement towards marriage equality was a “temporary aberration that will dissipate” and compared same-sex relationships to “pagan behaviours.”

In 2011, Newt Gingrich was showered in glitter by activists due to his then opposition for gay rights.