The Home Office has indicated that if Uganda’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill is passed by the country’s parliament, the UK may ban senior Ugandan politicians from entering Britain.

It comes after Conservative MP Mike Freer tabled a question in parliament calling on Home Office Minister Mark Harper to ban Ugandan parliamentarians who are complicit in passing the law on grounds concerning human rights.

The response by Mr Harper makes clear that individuals can be banned if “their exclusion from the UK is considered conducive for the public good.”

Mr Freer, speaking from the House of Commons, said:

“I am pleased the Home Office are prepared to take tough action against foreign politicians who oppress minorities and deny their citizens basic human rights. This is law is wrong, and we must do everything possible to stop its implementation.”

The Foreign & Commonwealth Office has also confirmed that they are continuing to apply pressure on the Ugandan President and other politicians.

Currently under consideration by the Ugandan Parliament, the bill stipulates the death penalty for repeat homosexual offenders and severe prison terms for many other aspects of gay life, behaviour and LGBT human rights advocacy.

Last month, Mr Freer who is the MP for Margaret Thatcher’s old London constituency of Finchley and Golders Green and an LGBT adviser for the Conservative Party, called on the government to withdraw funding to Uganda if it passes the law.

Conservative MEP for London Marina Yannakoudakis also made similar calls and urged the European Union to drop aid to the country as well.

Earlier in the week, dozens of people gathered outside the Ugandan High Commission in central London to protest against the bill.