LGBT-supporting global hacktivist group ‘Anonymous’ have targeted Hunter Moore, the former owner of a “revenge porn” website.

Mr Moore used to post sexual images of men and women without their permission, along with links to their social networking profiles, leaving victims open to online abuse and ridicule.

He then sold the website, IsAnyoneUp.com, to an anti-bullying charity in April this year.

Until that point it had gained notoriety for publishing pornographic pictures of men and women from all over the world, sent in by disgruntled ex-boyfriends and girlfriends.

Mr Moore has since been working on a new website which he has described as “something very scary but yet fun”.

According to the BBC, Mr Moore told technology blog Betabeat that the new site would “introduce the mapping stuff so you can stalk people”, but in a subsequent interview with Salon magazine he took back the comment, stating that he made it while “drunk”.

However, Anoymous are not impressed with his online notoriety and in a statement on Monday said:

“We will protect anyone who is victimised by abuse of our internet, we will prevent the stalking, rape, and possible murders as by-product of his sites.

It added: “Operation anti-bully. Operation hunt Hunter engaged. We are Anonymous, we are legion, we do not forgive, we do not forget, Hunter Moore, expect us.”

The group posted a video about their actions to Vimeo. In it, they showed pictures of Amanda Todd – a girl in Canada who committed suicide in October after topless photographs of her were circulated online.

Anonymous have since published details about Mr Moore, including the names of family members and his home address.

In the past few weeks, Anonymous have also been active in the area of LGBT rights.

Last month, members in New Jersey released names and email addresses of those connected with Uganda’s Committee on Legal and Parliamentary Affairs.

The committee recently scrutinised and approved Uganda’s draft Anti-Homosexuality Bill, which could be passed before Christmas.  

In August of this year, Anonymous protesters hacked into two of the Ugandan government’s websites, and accused it of “crimes against LGBT people”.