David Cameron says more needs to be done to increase HIV testing and has paid tribute to HIV/AIDS care and prevention workers in his annual World AIDS Day message.

Released ahead of next month’s 1 December event on the National AIDS Trust (NAT) YouTube page, the prime minister said:

“As we mark World AIDS Day, I want to add my voice once again to all of those who are working so hard to raise awareness of AIDS, to challenge stigma, and to support those living with HIV, to have full and productive happy lives.

“Thanks to effective treatment and the brilliant care of our NHS, an early diagnosis means the outlook for most people today with HIV in the UK is a good one.

“But some 25,000 people in the UK do not know they have it, or not benefiting from treatment, and are increasing the risk of passing the virus on.

“This means up to 600 people each year could be dying from a preventable, treatable condition”.

David Cameron then went on to mention the story of the Terrence Higgins Trust.

This year THT is marking its 30th anniversary.

The charity, which held a reception at London’s City Hall on Monday, was set up in 1982 after the death of Terry Higgins – a gay Hansard reporter in the House of Commons and barman at the Heaven nightclub.

Terry was among the first people known to die of an AIDS-related illness in the UK.