Enter your email address to receive our daily LGBT news roundup

You're free to unsubscribe at any time.

Scotland: Teen pleads guilty to killing gay barman

Post your comment

Comments on this article are now closed.

Reader comments

  1. Dimitris T 8 Nov 2012, 8:13pm

    I have read about this in a Greek gay site. Within this repulsive story of a crime there is though something reassuring: The solid intension of the state to find and prosecute the killer.

  2. kevin cather 8 Nov 2012, 9:05pm

    This is a terrible result. Some little confused, closet-case has consensual sex with and then because he feels uncomfortable with it he bit him, punched him, stamped on him, kicked him, strangles him and set fire to him but because he was ‘abused as a child’ somehow the courts understand his torment. This is INSANE!!!!! The guy is a bloody monster, plain and simple.

    1. Do you really think there’s such a thing as a ‘plain and simple’ case of a bloody monster? Do you think a prominent gay QC would act for the killer if it was all that straightforward?

      1. Barristers are forced to take on whatever cases they are given by the clerks Rehan. Its called the cab-rank rule.

    2. You have to understand how mental illness can affect someone severely: it’s not as simple as the kid being ‘a bloody monster’ — It is however a very odd reaction to it, definitely, and I am sure it is a very rare response to something like that. It doesn’t make what the kid did right at all, don’t get me wrong, and I’m surprised at how intense his reaction was.

  3. A very sad and complex case. Ryan was a victim of sexual abuse as a child. A bit simplistic to call him a ‘closet case’.

  4. ‘Sentenced next month.’ Three months holiday, all in? Disgusting verdict.

    1. Well, why not wait for the actual sentence before commenting on it?

  5. I wonder if the victim was a woman would they have accepted the defence?

  6. The authorities said early in the murder investigation that they did not believe this was a homophobic attack. Seems they had a pretty good idea who was responsible.

    Just because the attacker was gay in no way precludes this from being being a hate crime. The fact it wasn’t treated as such says more about homophobia of the authorities than anything else.

  7. I suggest you google this chaps defence lawyer ‘Derek Ogg’, not exactly anti gay is he? While Ryan had sex with this man he had terrible flashbacks of the abuse he suffered as a child.

    1. Do you really think that, just because he’s gay, in a civil partnership, and supports marriage equality, Ogg wouldn’t do his job – in this case defend a homophobic murderer – to the utmost of his ability?

      Esquierdo’s defence was very wily in their choice of advocate. In this case it paid dividends. An absolute disgrace to the Scottish judicial system. And there are plenty of similar cases in the rest of the United Kingdom.

    2. Someone who is having flashbacks of abuse during consensual sex would say “no” … “stop” or whatever wouldn’t they? They would make it known that they did not like what has happening.

  8. New Aussie 9 Nov 2012, 1:53am

    I just dont buy this. There are countless people who have been horrifically abused as children that do not go on to multilate and murder their first consensual sexual partners in fits of uncontrollable rage.

    Taken alongside the attempt by Strathclyde police to smear Walker as a paedophile when they knew full well he was not, this is just a travesty of justice that echos the old “homosexual panic” defence which I thought we had left behind a generation ago.

    SHAME!!!!

    1. Is that not a rather shallow and glib argument? After all, countless servicemen returned from combat zones don’t ‘flip out’ and murder their children or partners, yet some do (there’ve been a number of terrible such cases in the UK) – that’s what often falls under the category of port-traumatic stress disorder.

      I know very little about this particular case but try and imagine, for example, if you’d been abused as a child by a man: it’s said that abusers often make their victims feel they ‘deserved’ it – what would then happen if, in adulthood, you started feeling attracted to men? Isn’t it possible that the rage, confusion, terror, disgust could be overwhelming?

  9. Well if he is this psychotically deranged a long stint in a maximum security hospital is in order to protect the public.

  10. I don’t see how we can pass judgement on Esquierdo’s claim that he committed the attacks in a moment of PTSD. We don’t have access to the evidence.

    I hope Esquierdo’s sentence reflects the gravity of this awful crime, and that he gets psychiatric help so he never commits such violence again.

    But if his claim is true, this case shows how child abuse ruins lives over many years, contributing to Mr Walker’s death and ruining the lives of his family.

    The vast majority of people who were abused do not go on to commit horrific crimes like this. But almost all have great difficulty coping with what has been done to them, and some survivors reproduce cycles of physical or sexual violence.

    This case is a reminder of why child abuse is such a vile crime, and how important it is to listen to victims to help them get closure.

    Those who deliberately suppress claims of child abuse, as may have happened in North Wales, are storing up misery for the future, and must be prosecuted.

    1. Kathryn Howie 12 Nov 2012, 2:43am

      I agree with all of that.
      What has not been made clear is whether the abuser of Ryan Esquierdo has been prosecuted or the case even investigated or if it was what if any support was provided or offered to the victim subsequently.
      That needs to be followed up. What IS the current policy for support of abuse victims if a young person was to be the victim of similar abuse today, NOW!
      My reading of the report of the case was also that this was not Ryan Esquierdos’ first same-sex encounter – rather it was the situation of being quiet and in the dark the environment in which consensual sex occurred that triggered the flash back and thus the PTSD episode, even a quiet phrase or gesture that may have occurred in the original abuse could have set off the PTSD panic attack.
      We really need to start taking this seriously !

These comments are un-moderated and do not necessarily represent the views of PinkNews.co.uk. If you believe that a comment is inappropriate or libellous, please contact us.

Top commenters this week

Latest stories

See all