Further sexual abuse allegations have been made against the late Sir Peter Morrison, a gay former Conservative MP and ex-parliamentary aide to Margaret Thatcher.

In an interview broadcast on Tuesday evening, one former resident of a children’s home in Wales told Channel 4 News that he had seen a young boy driven away in a car by Morrison.

The former resident, who was not abused himself, said: “Going through some stuff recently and I saw his face. I know now he was the MP for Chester at the time. Morrison. Red, wavy hair. I recognised him straight away.

“I saw him at Bryn Estyn, he turned up in a car, boy went off in his car, don’t know if he was in it. It was definitely his car, I saw him arrive in it then we went to bed and we saw it drive off”.

Morrison died of a heart attack in 1995 aged 51.

In the past few weeks, his reputation in death has continued to fall from grace.

Speculation about Morrison’s private life began last month in the wake of the Jimmy Saville scandal.

Former Tory MP Edwina Currie told the Sunday Times that Morrision previously had engaged in sex with 16-year-old boys when the age of consent was 21.

Ms Currie said Morrison, a former deputy party chairman, was protected by a “culture of sniggering, of giggling and of nudge-nudge, wink-wink,” and that his behaviour was covered up by senior Tories.

At the end of October, the former leader of the Welsh Conservatives Rod Richards, described Morrison as a “paedophile”.

He made the remarks after seeing new evidence linking Morrison to the North Wales children’s homes scandal, in which up to 650 youngsters in 40 homes were sexually, physically and emotionally abused during the seventies and eighties.

Mr Richards was the MP for Clwyd North West until 1997 and served as a junior minister in the Welsh Office during the last Conservative government.

He helped establish an inquiry into the scandal, which is now being investigated by the current government, over claims that it only uncovered a fraction of the abuse.

Home Secretary Theresa May told the Commons on Tuesday that the head of the National Crime Agency would look at the allegations.