The leader of the British National Party is refusing to apologise for putting the address of a gay couple who won a court case on the internet and has said people have the “right to discriminate”.

On Thursday, MEP for the North West Nick Griffin published the Cambridgeshire address of Michael Black and John Morgan on Twitter and called for a demonstration to be held outside their home.

It was after their legal victory against the Christian owner of a bed and breakfast who refused to let them stay in a double room because of her religious views.

In response, Mr Griffin, who has previously described gay people as “creepy” and has admitted that he would like to ban civil partnerships, wrote on his twitter account @nickgriffinmep the address of Mr Black and Mr Morgan.

One of the tweets read: “So Messrs Black & Morgan, at [their address]. A British Justice team will come up to Huntington & give you a…

“…bit of drama by way of reminding you that an English couple’s home is their castle. Say No to heterophobia!”

Mr Griffin, who also referred to the couple as “2 bullying ‘gay’ activists” told Sky News:

“I was very angry in the way in which left-wing political activists and a minority of gay activists are working with left-wing judges to use the Human Rights Act to persecute ordinary people, especially Christians.

“I most definitely didn’t post a menacing message and there’s nothing inciteful,

“I said that we’d be holding a demonstration on behalf of everybody including gay people to decide who they have and don’t have in their homes.

“I don’t think that could be described as menacing”.

Mr Griffin added: “I only regret that we haven’t so far found the address of the judge who made that outrageous judgement because when we do we’ll be looking at a demonstration somewhere near that.”

Last night Cambridgeshire police launched an investigation into Mr Griffin’s tweets after receiving several complaints.

In an interview to the BBC, Mr Black said Mr Morgan said:

“We’ve been told that Nick Griffin is threatening to come to our house and hand out leaflets outside,” Mr Black added.

“But, we live in a village where it wouldn’t be easy for him or many people to come and gather.

“There’s nowhere to park for a start and very few people walk past apart from school children.

“If anything happens it would be a damp squib.”