A Chicago Alderman has asked Chick-fil-A to clarify their position after company executives agreed to stop funding anti-equal marriage charities, an agreement which was later denied by the company’s CEO.

Joe Moreno announced last week that, after 10 months of negotiations, Chick-fil-A had agreed to stop funding any group with a political agenda, including those opposed to equal marriage.

Alderman Moreno said on Sunday that Mr Cathy’s announcement had: “at the least, muddied the progress we had made with Chick-fil-A and, at the worst, contradicted the documents and promises Chick-fil-A made to me and the community earlier this month,” reported CNN.

“It’s pretty simple, Mr. Cathy. Do you acknowledge and support the policies that your executives outlined to me in writing or do you not? Yes or no?” said Joe Moreno in a written statement.

He described Mr Cathy’s announcement, that the company had not made concessions regarding funding charities opposed to equal marriage as “disturbing”.

Dan Cathy, CEO of Chick-fil-A, last week, denied that the company had re-evaluated its stance on donating money to anti-equal marriage charities, despite a letter from the company suggesting it had.

In a statement, posted online by Mike Huckabee, Mr Cathy said: “Chick-fil-A made no such concessions, and we remain true to who we are and who we have been.”

Just prior to that, the Civil Rights Agenda had confirmed, in a press release, that Alderman Moreno, had finished negotiations with Chick-fil-A, and that the company had agreed to stop funding charities with a political agenda, including those opposed to equal marriage.

Joe Moreno, an alderman who represents Chicago’s Logan Square neighbourhood, had said he would use his aldermanic privilege to block the restaurant’s permit. This meant city council members would have to defer to aldermen on local matters.

At the beginning of this debate, back in July the fast food company released a statement saying that it aimed to treat everyone with “honour, dignity and respect”, following Dan Cathy’s announcement that the company was “guilty as charged”, when he was asked about its perceived opposition to equal rights.