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Appeal against century-long ban on gay pride in Moscow is refused

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  1. While other countries move forward on their LGBT rights, Russia continues its path to go backwards.

    They try to stifle the younger Russian who are educated and this will only continue to happen for a while longer before the next generation of educated Russian stand up against those who hold them back.

  2. Geoff Jones 17 Aug 2012, 12:16pm

    The European Court of Human Rights should make it a rule of membership in Europe that no member country can have anti-gay laws, or otherwise degrade the LGBT community. The same should also apply to gender and colour discrimination.

    1. The European Convention on Human Rights, to which Russia is a signatory, as further interpreted by the European Court of Human Rights, which enforces the convention and consists of judges nominated by all member states, already does require all those. Russia abides by most of the rights, and most judgements, but is particularly a problem on LGB rights.

      The body of which the signatories are members is the Council of Europe, which has its own parliament, made up of seconded members of the national parliaments of the members, in Strasbourg. It is separate from the European Union.

      Unfortunately the CoE well knows it is in the position with Russia of choosing whether to tolerate some of its infringements as hopefully temporary, and allow its judge to vote badly in some court judgements, or expel the country and leave its citizens with no recourse.

      The Russian judge’s vote ended an equal marriage case from Austria 2 years ago, so it affects us all.

  3. 100 years!! Are they for real?

    My god how backward are they? I hope they realise this is the 21st century not the 16th.

    1. Alexeev got what he wanted. It was him who submitted the 100 years request. He knew what would happen when it’s denied.

      1. Yeah, right. Those damn uppity gays causing all the trouble. They should just sit down and smile through the state-sanctioned hatred that comes their way.

  4. It sis my understanding that ECHR doesn’t cover Russia?

    1. I think Russia is a member, but the VAST majority of ongoing cases are against Russia. The country doesn’t adhere to any of the rulings the court makes.

      1. See my reply above. It is, and does, mostly. But it is bad on LGB matters, and going that way on religion and free speech. ISTR most of the applications to the court now come from Russian citizens, with the UK second. Belarus would be a huge problem if it were a member, but it isn’t – a huge hole in human rights coverage.

  5. The Russian Orthodox Church welds a lot of influence in Russian politics. Most Orthodox Churches may seem benign because they don’t make the headlines the way the Catholic Church does, but this group of Churches in Russia, Bulgaria, Greece, Belarus, Ukraine, etc are very homophobic and hateful. They are usually behind most of the anti-gay pride demonstrations in these countries.

    1. Cardinal Capone 17 Aug 2012, 1:22pm

      As I understand it, they have their own blackshirts, who cause the violence. Reminds me of Iran.

    2. The Russian version is a state church. Like the Church of England but more so. The state funds new Russian Orthodox churches in other countries. Yes, it is very hateful; hence the Pussy Riot demo in the Moscow cathedral.

      1. A state church, is it really? When did that happen? I’m hopelessly ignorant about Russia really, but I thought organised religion had a really tough time of it in the Communist era: when did that change, and has it been a matter of public policy?

  6. Pavlos Prince of Greece 17 Aug 2012, 1:11pm

    Only way for more freedom for gay community in Russia – secularisation, or more exactly – resecularisation of Russian society. Its not so important, who govern in Kreml, until the only unquestionable rule in Russia is this of Orthodox church.

  7. Dave North 17 Aug 2012, 1:28pm

    This is just sheer badness for the sake of badness.

    There is no other way to describe it.

  8. Robert Carruthers 17 Aug 2012, 2:25pm

    This is the “canary in the coal mine” of human rights in Russia. What better illustration do we need of Russia’s steady slide towards neo-fascism? Be afraid, be very afraid.

  9. “Mr Alexeyev said: “After an extended period, the city refused to issue permits for the rallies for this year and for all of the next 100 years. They cited possible riots, as well as public opinion which came out against it.””
    If it wasn’t so serious, I would find it funny that Russia thinks it can predict public opinion up to 100 years in advance.

  10. Russia is deciding now that it will make no social changes for the next 100 years?! Bigotry doesn’t go much deeper.

  11. I so admire Alexeyev for his bravery in that increasingly bonkers and backwards nation.

    I also feel desperately sorry for gay Russians, what a hideous society to be trapped in.

    1. You are being a bit melodramatic; things are a great deal better than they were here in the 1960s, or in Russia in the 1980s. There are open LGB groups and a lively social scene, and no general persecution (up until the new local laws against “promotion of homosexuality” associating it with danger to children). The is transsexual treatment and legal recognition (if an official track is followed). The problem is the pubic sphere, where the increasingly powerful churches, and a rising assertion of national “morals”, are going along with reasserting national self-confidence as the country’s natural wealth makes it a greater power in the world again. So the politicians, courts, police, marches and marriage are big problems. And these “promotion” laws, if they stand.

      To an extent this may be a short term reaction after having been lectured so extensively when low.

      1. I hope you’re right and I am just being melodramatic. I can only go by the news as reported, and that seems to me increasingly dismal for gay people.

    2. Alexeyev is outstanding, but did he seriously think the authorities were going to respond by saying they would start allowing parades, say in five years, and every year thence for the next 94? He would immediately have had it overturned and an immediate one allowed (which of course they should be, under ECHR rights). Its publicity, but necessary to keep the issues alive. However, as we see, it isn’t only LGB public manifestations that are barred. There is general problem there with political freedom.

      Its interesting that Yury Gavrikov, who protested Madonna in St Petersburg as a hypocrite for going ahead with her concert, got a license for a pride march there, in the name of his group Ravnopraviye. He might be a covert agent of the state of course (protesting Madonna would fit that), in the way things were long done there, but it might be a window. The real test is the country’s higher courts: if they discriminate then things are really bad.

  12. I could never understand Alexeev’s desire to hold a parade. What is he trying to achieve? He knows full well that the general public will be against it and there should be other ways of fighting for the rights. But no, he’s so obsessed with the parade it’s not even funny anymore.

    1. Do you think the British public were particularly supportive of the first gay pride marches in London and elsewhere? Surely they’re most needed where the general support is lacking?

    2. Your the one who’s no funny! Pride Marches are a visable way of stating we are still here and have not gone away, we have fought long and hard in this country and others to get where we are now.In the past we were more active and hard lined via groups like Outrage, who helped forge the minds of the public and the political parties that we will not be silenced. Russia is firmly demonstrating that it does NOT want equal rights for the LGBT community by passing a law beyond belief. 100 year ban! Its Russia that is off the rails of democracy and equality and they will be fought long and hard. Russia will eventually pay for this.

  13. Where is the condemnation from other world leaders on this total affront to human rights? Where is the European Courts responce? They are a signatory. Does that mean nothing? Homophobia is the new racism and its about time there was swift action and responce to such threats and proclomations against the LGBT community,the world over! Gay Rights are Human Rights.

  14. We must organize a boycott of the 2014 Olympics in Russia. That’s the only thing the Russians care about.

    1. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/christiaan-rapcewicz/sochi-2014-the-antihomose_b_1777340.html

      I agree completely. There is time to do it too. Putin should be shamed.

  15. I used to love Russia and I’ve always wanted to visit.

    Not anymore. Or ever again. Shocking bigotry.

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