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Survey: 7 percent ‘led to unprotected sex’ by bareback porn

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  1. Samuel B. 8 Aug 2012, 6:29pm

    The results are no surprise, but well done to the GMFA for conducting the survey as previously they have been noncommittal over their stance on bareback porn, stating they are against censorship of any kind.

    There is a clear correlation between this medium and the incentivising effect it has on a core number of its viewers.

    Personally I would be pushing the British Board of Film Classification not to rate such films, not least as some are known to contain negative actors who are pressured into appearing in them because they pay more cash then safe sex porn.

    It is not a question of censorship and the right to choose what we like to watch behind closed doors.

    It IS a question of do we feed this trade by allowing it to fan the flames of HIV infection among its actors and audiences when we know what the longterm cost will be in terms of health, well being and to an already cash-strapped NHS which is looking to reduce its medications costs?

    It is common sense that is lacking here.

  2. This is a really interesting survey – I beleived there would be a stronger correlation between watching bareback porn & guys actually having more bb sex – seems not to be the case.

    Interestingly 70 of those surveyed didn’t think BB porn should be made illegal in the UK & 80% didnt think websites featuring bb porn should be banned.

    I guess as gay guys we very much like our porn (not something that has interested me) but I wonder how “true to themselves” the responders were when they answered the question relating to bb porn & bb sex – 7 % does seem suprisingly low given many of the comments I have read on here in relation to bb porn.

    There is a perception that younger guys are often thorught to be more at risk of bb sex as a result of watching porn but there is a suggestion that it is the number of different partners guys have that shows a strong correlation to having bb sex.

    Lots of debate I’m very sure!

  3. I am opposed to censorship but every episode of unsafe sex is potentially handing ammunition to the bigots. If anyone doubts that read the comments of those opposed to marriage equality in online debates about the issue, they always drag this issue up, even though, if anything, it’s an argument in favour of marriage equality. It’s used as part of the “icky” argument.

  4. Samuel B. 8 Aug 2012, 8:12pm

    This survey corresponds with another interesting report yesterday on the BBC web site titled “Campaigners say the young don’t know enough about HIV” with PN appears to have missed:-

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/19152590

    Again nothing we did not already know about despite the best efforts of the one gay men’s HIV charity it does name drop to convince us that it is mainly older gay men at risk of seroconversion.

    Maybe we will start seeing some common sense procedures being applied to HIV prevention in the UK, as the evidence is now too overwhelming to look the other way and to pretend bareback porn does not influence gay men into unsafe sex, and that the young do not need to be specifically targeted.

    What many gay men may want (bareback porn) is not necessarily what they need, and that is where legislation is required to protect the weaker willed, the gullible and more vulnerable among us.

  5. Only 7% admitted to having “tried this at home” – but how many have been influenced by porn but are too embarrassed to say so?

    Regardless, banning legal, consensual acts is tricky. Recent cases, including R v Peacock and Simon Walsh’s case, indicate that juries are reluctant to restrict not just possession but also distribution of porn involving consenting adults, and it’s hard to see how bareback porn could be criminalised.

    As I’ve argued on PN before, though, I do think there’s a good case for introducing safety at work legislation banning bb in commercial porn. If there are financial incentives for people to risk their health, some people are always going to do it. We don’t let employees work in smoky bars any more, and if we can ban that then I think we can ban commercial barebacking for the same reasons.

  6. Aryu Gaetu 9 Aug 2012, 12:03am

    Cause & Effect Backwards?

    I am not into anal sex, and viewing anal sex would not cause me to try it.

    It seems that someone would be predisposed and curious about barebacking PRIOR to viewing the video. I don’t think the video created the idea, but probably just solidified (pun intended) the existing fantasy.

    I have strong feelings against trying to induce social morality through laws. It always has the exact opposite effect of what was intended. It pushes it underground and makes it impossible to track and regulate.

    Wherever possible, decriminalize it, regulate it to make it safer, then tax the hell out of it.

    As with other hazardous products, require a warning at the beginning of the video, then let the adults live their own life.

    1. Sure, I think people would have to be curious to begin with, but seeing actions depicted positively do, I think, make a huge difference to the way people come to accept them – I’m thinking in particular about rimming, which I would suggest fewer people would try if it weren’t routinely, even mundanely, shown in porn.

      1. If you’re not into anal sex, clearly bareback porn would not influence you to try it.

        But most gay men do tend to enjoy bareback sex and years of “condom fatigue” have reached the point where many are looking for the flimsiest of excuses to dispose with them.

        Bareback porn glamorises something that we are not supposed to do as responsible adults and therefore is breaking a taboo, and as such can be highly intoxicating and incentivising.

        Yesterday’s BBC news web site report highlighted how many gay youngsters cannot differentiate between the seriousness of various STIs.

        Ad campaigns for STIs and HIV have been largely interchangeable because the HIV charities are not also educating what sets HIV apart from the rest – not least that it stays with you forever – whereas other STIs are treatable and curable.

        There are youngsters out there who think all STIs are alike, ad therefore are prepared to copy what they see in bareback porn because they’re not fully informed of the consequences.

        1. But most gay men do tend to enjoy bareback sex

          Really? I have no way of knowing if that’s true or not. As someone aware of the toll HIV/AIDS took on an earlier generation I find that both shocking and depressing.

          I find the glamorising of BB porn from the US to be profoundly dismaying, but maybe it’s just Darwinianism in action: those stupid enough to willingly risk their health and possibly their lives for a shag and/or money will be weeded out in time. What a sad thought.

  7. Oops, I should have written “most gay men do enjoy anal sex”…

    In addition to the glamourising aspect is the fact that if a bareback film is rated, it is being legitimised in that it has a government stamp of approval for a certain audience, thereby also sending out the subliminal message that the government condones reckless, unsafe behaviour.

    On the other hand the government recognises its duty to do what it can to reduce transmission rates, so is culpable of sending out mixed messages that inevitably serve to exacerbate HIV rates over the long-term.

    The makers of bareback porn are actually impacting on all of us because for every actor that becomes infected on a shoot, or customer who becomes seropositive having been influenced and incentivised by their output, adds £500,000 each time to our tax bills in treatments, etc.

    It is, actually, an absurd, even insane, situation, particularly considering the lengths health & safety go to to ensure safe practises in the workplace…

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