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US 2010 census reveals gay couples more likely to be interracial

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  1. Yes but was does interacial mean in the USA? In Europe we find it shocking that Obama is described in America as a ‘black president’ as he has a white mother so that category is patently untrue. Does a relationship between an American of Spanish origin and one of Scottish descent constitute interacial?

    1. ” In Europe we find it shocking that Obama is described in America as a ‘black president’”

      We do?

      1. Well, if not shocking it’s certainly notable. Just as Halle Berry is always referred to as a ‘black’ actress when in reality she’s less than half black.

        1. what is black anyway?

          1. Well that’s another huge discussion, isn’t it?! But I think most Sub-Saharan Africans can be said to be ‘black’. It’s less easy to categorise in the West Indies, where more people are likely to be mixed-race.

            Once (not all that long ago, well into the 20c) even people from the Indian Subcontinent were referred to as ‘black’ (or worse), but ‘brown’ has now become the preferred term.

        2. So what do you think Halle Berry/Obama should refer to themselves as?

          I genuinely interested, I’m not being accusative.

          1. @Joss: I think the term ‘mixed-race’ is gaining popularity, especially in the UK.

  2. It’s always struck me as odd that interracial relationships seem to be so taboo in the USA.

    It shocks me that it seems to be increasingly taboo in some parts of the UK too.

    People really need to worry about more important things.

    The arguments against interracial marriage seem to be about racial purity, since two men and two women can’t procreate together it’s moot (not that it’s at all credible in the first place).

    1. I think it’s because of the history of slavery. A South Asian relation of mine married in the American South, and I remember asking his wife why it didn’t seem to be an issue. She replied that it’s because he’s South Asian – a very small minority in the US, and generally associated with the educated, white-collar professional classes – and if he’d been ‘black’ it’d have been a different issue.

  3. 2010? forgive me is this year 2012, also FYI http://www.lgbt2012census.com/

    1. Yes, the 2010 census. The info on 300 million people DOES take more than a year to examine and extrapolate, so the data emerging in 2012 is not surprising.

  4. I have to say that in my own, no doubt limited, experience in London, the rarest gay couple of all is one where both partners are of the same nationality and/or race. In fact, out of literally dozens of male couples, I know none who’re monocultural under the age of 50.

    A psychiatrist friend of mine (a New Zealander with a Serbian partner whom he met in London) once put forward the theory that the cultural differences could be said to be a sort of mirror of the gender differences you get get in non-gay couples – ie that there’s always going to be an element of the ‘other’ that you don’t quite comprehend. It’s an idea worth considering, I think.

  5. “… compared with 18.3% of straight unmarried couples and 9.5% of straight unmarried couples.” Er, what?

  6. GingerlyColors 27 Apr 2012, 12:30am

    Interesting. One possibility is that interacial relations are more common amongst gay couple is because by simply being gay, many people had to reject the traditional conventions of their communities. In many traditional societies marrying outside the community is still considered taboo. You only had to watch the recent Fat Gypsy Weddings series on C4 to see how the travelling community reacts if a member marries a non-traveller. By the same token Muslims do not like it if one of their number marries a non-Muslim. In the gay community we have rejected prejudice and social constraints and we will choose whoever we wish to spend the rest of our lives with.

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