Rick Santorum’s decision to end his campaign seeking the Republican party’s nomination to run for presidential race later this year has boosted the proportion of gay-friendly policies in race by 6 percent, according to an analysis released today.

The analysis by Marriage Equality USA (MEUSA) examines twelve key issues affecting gay and transgender community of America and records all the presidential hopefuls’ views.

Since the summer of 2011, MEUSA has tallied the candidates’ positions from the thirteen initial hopefuls, including incumbent Barack Obama and former candidates Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry to the eight candidates left today.

Although Rick Santorum’s exit last night brings the total views on gay equality up from 54 to 60 percent, the tally is not weighted by candidates’ likelihood of winning the race. Republicans outnumber other candidates as they are yet to secure a nominee.

The views of Barack Obama, the Republic hopefuls Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul, Fred Karger are counted alongside Green candidate Jill Stein, Libertarian Gary Johnson and Reform Party’s Buddy Roemer.

Hopefuls are recorded as being in favour of, opposed to or undecided on the following: full marriage equality, civil unions, domestic partnerships, foreign spouse citizenship, the repeal of DOMA, adoption for gay and transgender couples, civilian employment for federal workers and other workers and the appointment of LGBT-aware judges.

The candidates are also tallied for their views on military equality, including the ability to serve openly, equal pay and benefits and the ability to have on-base weddings.

Mr Santorum was consistently opposed to equality in all these issues and has said he would support an amendment to the United States constitution that would invalidate gay marriages.

In August 2011, the panel was dominated by Republican candidates seeking their party’s nomination stood in contract to the single Democrat Barack Obama, who will aim to remain in the White House this year.

60 percent of the views expressed on MEUSA’s benchmark issues in that analysis were opposed to gay and trans equality, with only 24 percent in favour.

Now however, as the Republican numbers have diminished with more nomination hopefuls dropping out, Mr Santorum’s exit last night reverses those figures and shows 60 percent of the presidential hopefuls’ policies as being in favour of gay equality.

On the issues selected by MEUSA, only 29% of the policies remaining in the race are opposed to equality, with Republicans still accounting for half the candidates.

MEUSA Election 2012 Project Manager Ned Flaherty said: “Every time the data changes we publish an update, so that journalists, voters, and candidates all know exactly where everyone stands on each issue, and it’s certainly having an effect.”

Brian Silva, Executive Director of Marriage Equality New York added: “Most Americans from all walks of life continue to use their votes during this primary season to say loudly and clearly — to politicians across the ideological spectrum — that protecting and expanding equal rights for their LGBT neighbors, colleagues, friends and family members is important. This includes the right to civil marriage.”

Towards the end of his campaign, Mr Santorum told a boy not use a pink bowling ball during a campaign photo opportunity at a Wisconsin bowling alley because “friends don’t let friends use pink balls”.