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Possible gay link to death of French academic in New York

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  1. The closet is a dangerous place to live.

  2. Is there any need to broadcast this guy’s business all over the net before establishing whether or not this has any relevance to his death?

    1. Paddyswurds 6 Apr 2012, 1:23pm

      My thoughts exactly on reading the story…. No ones business but his own…..even if he was out, which apparently he was in Paris.

  3. terminalose 6 Apr 2012, 1:19pm

    In the closet ? LOL no, in france we knew that he was gay ( in couple with SNCF’s CEO). French’s media don’t say that gay people are gay, they don’t say a word.

    1. Dennis Battler 6 Apr 2012, 1:39pm

      Understanding the natural place sex inhabits in human beings, and being absent of puritanical protestant heritage, remains a uniquely French phenomenon. Refraining from public discussion of sexual interactions points to the society’s insight into human beings simply being human beings. Nothing more nothing less. The French are more concerned with the elegance of sexual expression engaged in – not speaking of it publicly falls into elegant behaviour. Societies obsessed with moral behaviour as gaining favour with their god are the societies bereft of understanding natural man and the natural place of sex, gay or straight.

      1. You are correct until the last part. France’s attitude is actually a very Catholic attitude. It is in the Protestant puritican lreligious zealotry countries, which have now overthrown this unrealistic and unnnatural form of Christianity, which introduced the harshest of lawas against, for instance, people involved in homosexual activity. Catholicism, as seen with its culture of confession, has always had a more subtle form of understanding humans as public and private creatures. The breaking point in Catholic culture can generally be summed up with: “soft on sin, harsh on heresy”!

      2. David Thomas 7 Apr 2012, 7:04pm

        I found this a whole elegant explanation and oddly very uplifting thank you.

  4. Ikenna David. 6 Apr 2012, 2:16pm

    @ Chris, just couldn’t agree more…. But if he was an American or british, this revealation would have caused different propaganda.. The press would have given him a proper burial… My thoughts with the family though!!

  5. Heartfelt sympathy for Richard Descoings’ family, loved ones and friends.

  6. The Christians suck this stuff and use it to make gays look bad. Like Christians don’t have affairs and kill themselves, they do, only they try to hid them like they hide the little boys they rape by paying off who ever they need to pay off or threaten or even kill. Christians have hit men just like the mafia. Christians have become more dangerous than the closet.

    1. de Villiers 6 Apr 2012, 9:37pm

      The term “Christians” has as much value as “gays”.

    2. George, sorry mate but have to disagree with your language – that’s why I wrote above what is below. French culture is a product of Catholic Christianity – a case of what people do in the privacy of their own lives is ultimately up to them. In Catholic cultures things only become a major problem once people start promoting things publicly that are deemed “wrong” or “sinful”. Protestantism is the problem.

      “You are correct until the last part. France’s attitude is actually a very Catholic attitude. It is in the Protestant puritican lreligious zealotry countries, which have now overthrown this unrealistic and unnnatural form of Christianity, which introduced the harshest of lawas against, for instance, people involved in homosexual activity. Catholicism, as seen with its culture of confession, has always had a more subtle form of understanding humans as public and private creatures. The breaking point in Catholic culture can generally be summed up with: “soft on sin, harsh on heresy”!”

      1. Protestantism is the problem.

        And yet, all the original advances in gay rights were in nominally Protestant countries like The Netherlands, Denmark and Sweden. The lack of anti-gay laws in countries like France and Italy is largely due to the powerful anti-clericalism of Napoleon.

        1. christophe 9 Apr 2012, 2:16pm

          1) Richard Descoing didn’t facilitate entry to “Paris’ revered university” for underprivileged students – he facililitated their entry to one of France’s prestigious “grandes écoles” a level of higher education unknown in the UK and the USA and which are superior to the universities in France. In Richard Descoing’s case it was entry to “Sciences Po” (the School of Political Science”) to which he facilitated access as its Director.
          2)”The lack of anti-gay laws in countries like France and Italy is largely due to the powerful anti-clericalism of Napoleon.” Really ? Is that why French labour law forbids all discrimination linked to sexual orientation and why hate speech against homosexuals is illegal in France ?
          3)Finally, I’m not sure what Rehan calls “original advances” but Spain (not a protestant country as far as I know) has introduced same sex marriage (still lacking in the UK) and France was one of the first E-U countries to introduce registered partnerships (in 1999)

        2. Good point Rehan, but these moves are due to the puritinical Protestantism – a response against, not because.

          Catholic culture has tended to be, ironically, more liberal. After all, one of the main reasons for the so-called Reformation was the claim that Catholicism was morally lax (and also had the Sacrament of Confession which accepted peopel and life was not perfect. One Protestant idea was the false idea that when one became a Christian one no longered sinned. Human experience says that is unrealistic and will only lead to people rejecting Christ altogether.)

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