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Interview: Phillip Ward on the inimitable Quentin Crisp

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  1. crisp was a dickhead

    1. If we want historical figures for representation I’d opt for less of the stereotype.In today’s world he would simply be extremely annoying – probably get a job as a judge on a prime time dance comptetionn – if that. I guess he had his time – and I’m glad it was then and not now.

    2. Paul, Watch The Naked Civil Servant’ and tell me you would be so brave. I doubt you would be as brave as he was , to walk through your town, dress and made up as he was and take the abuse he did, then do it all again the next day. He was one of a kind, witty, intelligent and insightful. And if he wasn’t a believer in Gay rights then that’s ok too…not all of us are. In his own way he gave us viability when there was little of it about. So judge him as you wish I doubt Mr Crisp would disagree with you, he never sought or needed anyone’s approval to be.

      1. I’m sure he was very brave, but based on the number of gay men you may know or have met how representative do you think he is? We do not exist to to be camp martyrs, that achieves nothing, we are not some sort of freak show. Other than our sexuality our interests and views are as diverse as the rest of the population.

        It really doesn’t help people who are faced with decisions to make about coming out to hold Mr Crisp up as a representative of the gay /bi community.

    3. Staircase2 1 Jan 2012, 3:41am

      I think we all know who’s the dickhead here…
      (and it aint Mr Crisp…)

  2. I think he found himself in a bully pulpit, but lacked the wit to use it responsibly.

    1. Staircase2 1 Jan 2012, 3:41am

      …Where does Pink News get these idiots?

  3. Quentin Crisp’s The Naked Civil Servant and the movie meant a huge amount to gay people of my vintage (now mid 50’s). It was one of the first gay movies on TV here in Aus, and opened the eyes and hearts of many straight people whose experience of `those people’ was a construct of bigoted Christians. Sure he could have done more for `gay rights’ in a political sense, but he did not belong to that generation and perhaps the subtlety of his message had more effect. Rather than political rhetoric, Crisp confronted people with himself. Most were left speechless.

    1. Staircase2 1 Jan 2012, 3:43am

      I dont get the ‘could have done more for gay rights in a political sense’ stance…
      How more Political you want someone to be than actually LIVING their life openly and fearlessly?

  4. GingerlyColors 29 Dec 2011, 6:38am

    Quentin Crisp is was a unique character who became famous more for his sexuality than anything else and how he coped with living in a country where homosexuality was illegal. He even faced discrimination from other gays as well as society in general due to his effeminate style. He eventually found happiness in New York and thanks to high-profile people like him stay-at-home Englishmen like us are enjoying a better quality of life.

  5. Staircase2 1 Jan 2012, 3:40am

    I love Quentin Crisp :o)

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