Thursday marks exactly 20 years since the death of the legendry Queen frontman Freddie Mercury.

Fans of the iconic singer, along with the rest of the music world have been remembering the iconic showman.

Mercury, 45, passed away at his London home on 24 November 1991.

He had been diagnosed HIV positive several years earlier and died of bronchial pneumonia, brought on by AIDS.

Queen’s lead singer is remembered for his captivating live performances, searing vocals and enduring classics such as “We Are The Champions”, “Killer Queen” and “Bohemian Rhapsody”.

Commenting on today’s anniversary, the Chief Executive of Terrence Higgins Trust, Sir Nick Partridge, said:

“For many people, Freddie Mercury’s death was a defining moment in the early years of the HIV epidemic.

“It crystallised how much talent we lost during those years, and helped heighten awareness of HIV in a way that even the best public health campaigns would struggle to do.

“That was twenty years ago and, thanks to the introduction of effective drug treatments, someone diagnosed with HIV today has every chance of living well into old age.

“However, that doesn’t mean HIV has gone away.

“Next year, there will be more people with the condition in this country than ever before; that’s 100,000 individuals who face a lifetime of daily medication and – all too often – discrimination”.

Sir Nick added: “In the run up to World AIDS Day on 1 December, it’s important to remember those we lost, and also reflect on where we are today.”

A film about Mercury, starring Borat creator Sacha Baron Cohen, is currently being developed.

It’s expected to focus on the years leading up to Queen’s unforgettable performance at the Live Aid concert in 1985.

This year, the band also marked its 40th anniversary.

In 1987, Mercury told journalist David Wigg that he had no fears of becoming a lonely, rich 70-year-old.

“I’ve lived a full life and if I’m dead tomorrow, I don’t give a damn. I really have done it all”, he said.