Lady Gaga will be honoured with a Hero Award for the US gay youth charity The Trevor Project, while Google receives one for its work promoting its gay employees.

The charity, which works with LGBT youth to prevent suicide by offering support over the telephone and online, will be giving the award at its annual Trevor Live event in Hollywood on 4 December.

The bisexual star announced this month the launch of the Born This Way Foundation, named after her hit single and album that will focus on issues including bullying prevention.

Last week, Lady Gaga topped a poll of Stonewall supporters as the celebrity who was seen to have done most to tackle bullying this year, with 46% of the vote.

David McFarland, Interim Executive Director and CEO of The Trevor Project, said: “Our young people are at the center of a health crisis, and vocal leaders like Lady Gaga and technology leaders like Google Inc have stepped up to help change our culture.

“Our honorees are working with The Trevor Project to make a better today and a brighter tomorrow for youth. We are proud to honor Lady Gaga with the Trevor Hero Award and Google Inc with the Trevor 2020 award for their work to help young people express their true selves with pride.”

The Trevor Hero Award will be given to Lady Gaga for being an “inspiration to youth” and increasing visibility and understanding of LGBT people.

The charity said Google Inc had become a leader in championing LGBT workplace equality over the past decade by advocating for equal policies and benefits for employees, expanding the presence of their LGBTQ employee resource group globally.

Yolanda Mangolini, Director of Global Diversity & Inclusion and Talent & Outreach Programs at Google Inc. said: “We are honored and humbled to be recognized with the Trevor 2020 Award.

“We applaud The Trevor Project for their commitment to providing services and creating safe spaces for LGBTQ youth in need, and look forward to a continued partnership.”

In 2010, Google voluntarily compensated gay and lesbian workers in the US for inequalities they experienced in tax laws.

Federal laws which do not recognise gay relationships mean that gay workers pay more tax when their partners receive domestic health benefits.

Straight married couples do not have to pay the tax, which has been estimated to be as high as $1,000 a year.

When users search for gay-related terms in June, usually recognised as Pride month, Google wraps a rainbow around the search box.

The Trevor Project was recently named one of the White House’s Champion of Change, for leadership and innovation in suicide prevention.

Alan Cumming won the charity’s Hero Award in 2008.