Update: John Galliano was given a suspended fine of 6,000 euros.

Former Dior designer John Galliano has been given a suspended fine of 6,000 euros for using racist and anti-Semitic slurs.

The disgraced fashion star avoided jail for two outbursts in a Parisian cafe last February and October.

Galliano, who was convicted of “casting public insults based on origin, religious affiliation, race or ethnicity” was not present to hear his sentence at the Palais de Justice in Paris today.

He was sacked as Dior’s chief fashion designer over the remarks.

Geraldine Bloch, 35, said the designer began insulting her in the La Perle bar on February 24th.

She claimed he told her she had a “dirty Jewish face” in a 45-minute tirade.

Her partner Philippe Virgitti, 41, said Galliano called him a “dirty Asian s***” and an “illegal immigrant”.

Another woman, Fatiha Oumeddour, 47, said the designer had called her “f***ing ugly dirty Jewish bastard” in the same bar last October.

After the first allegations, a video emerged of Galliano apparently telling two women that their grandparents should have been “gassed” and proclaiming that he loved Hitler.

The designer admitted that he had been drinking heavily and taking Valium like “candy” on the day of February’s incident.

He told June’s trial he was not racist or anti-Semitic and had fought discrimination throughout his life.

His lawyer said today: “Mr Galliano is relieved. Relieved that these eight months are behind him. He is looking forward to a future with understanding and forgiveness, hopefully, and to put all of this behind him.”

Recently, it was revealed that Galliano’s right-hand man, Steven Robinson, had died of a cocaine overdose in 2007.

Initially, Mr Robinson’s cause of death was reported as a heart attack but it emerged last month that drug dealer Alassane Seck, a 40-year-old illegal immigrant from Senegal, was convicted of Robinson’s manslaughter.

Galliano said: “I am a recovering alcohol addict. I’ve been in Arizona for two months following a rehab programme.

“Steven protected me from everything so I could be creative. With his death I found I had no protection.”