CNN are to screen a three-part documentary about a form of ‘experimental therapy’ designed to make ‘feminine’ boys more masculine.

The documentary, entitled The Sissy Boy Experiment, tells the story of Kirk Andrew Murphy who despite success in school, the Air Force and his subsequent career, took his own life in 2003 at the age of 38.

As CNN reveal, initial confusion as to why Murphy took his life led to the emergence of a dark secret.

According to his mother, Kaytee Murphy, he “played with girls’ toys”, and displayed “too many effeminate traits”.

She said it bothered her because she wanted her son to have “a normal life.”

Unluckily for the five-year-old Kirk, in 1970, a psychologist was advertising on local television recruiting boys for a government-funded programme at the University of California, Los Angeles. There, he was treated largely by George A. Rekers who instructed the boy’s parents in techniques for training their son in the “correct” way to act.

This included “therapy” including being denied all attention and affection by his mother if he played with the “wrong” toys and being rewarded for playing with the “right” ones i.e. plastic guns and handcuffs.

At home, Kirk was physically punished for displaying “effeminate” behavior.

Dr George Rekers later built a three-decade career as a leading national expert in preventing children from becoming gay, and as an anti-gay champion. He was also a founding member of the Family Research Council, a faith-based organisation that lobbies against gay rights issues.

His career came to end last year however, when he hired a male escort to accompany him on a trip to Europe. Rekers denied any sexual contact with the escort.

In 2009, Rekers co-authored a book entitled Handbook of Therapy for Unwanted Homosexual Attractions in which he cited Kirk’s Murphy’s case as a success.

When tracked down by CNN, Rekers told them that it was “inaccurate to assume” that the therapy led to Kirk Murphy’s suicide.

Even more shockingly have been surgical interventions carried out by US surgical staff on girls with intersex conditions such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

Such intervention, which aims to “normalise” the individuals concerned, has led to operations carried out on the “over-sized” clitorises of girls as young as two years old, leaving them damaged and, in some cases, incapable of ever having a satisfactory sex life.