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Home Office says gay sex convictions will be deleted

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  1. If completely deleted then no record of government mistreatment of gay people exist. Government should pay millions in compensation to gay people who went prison. They won’t. Government is ass.

  2. Johnzaloog 11 Feb 2011, 9:58pm

    Honestly, I don’t think they should be destroyed. They are historical documents, and this can be important for study of countries developing equal rights in the future. Admittedly, they could make digital copies and put them out for public access, but I still think keeping originals would be preferable.

  3. Johnzaloog 11 Feb 2011, 9:59pm

    oops, re-read, they stay public anyway, my bad.

  4. Jock S. Trap 12 Feb 2011, 8:32am

    I wonder if theres a bit of scaremongering going on here to try and get the higher points.

    They will have to delete because if they don’t they soon find themselves on the end of a legal process. That could cost them.

    I have no doubt what they are planning to do is delete and that means these convictions removed.

  5. It’s good news, a long time coming. Though you are right Jock; part of the reason the Government decided to change this [apart from it being unfair] was that they were threatened with a judicial review.

  6. YuriFury: You are an idiot.
    Laws constantly evolve and change based on the society at the time.
    Would you like to reimburse suffragettes for not having a vote?

    One cannot change history, and those people committed crimes, whether you agree the law was wrong or not.

  7. Deletion – good !!! No-one can be influenced by these anymore..

    On a lighter note it seems that the bill will also let you do your CPs after hours…..

  8. I don’t think there will be many convictions simply because someone is/was homosexual.
    The vast majority of convictions, I imagine, will be for gross indecency; whether the act was performed in public or private or as a result of a police trap, something that was common practice.
    Yfor gross indecency are never wiped out and remain with you for life, they can never be spent. This will exclude the person from any decent employment for life.
    I see this as a lot of hot air by a government attempting to keep a certain percentage of the population on its’ side.
    If they wish to do something then all these convictions need to be wiped out and any documentation or records destroyed.

  9. Jock S. Trap 13 Feb 2011, 11:29am

    Clearly PinkNews don’t like to be there when the news breaks what with the important new story this morning, since the early hours, still waiting….

  10. WHETHER YOU DELETE the convictions or not, the practice of homosexuality remains immoral and harmful, even if you try to cover it with nice-sounding political correctness. It is shame how many good people succumbed into this abominable lifestyle!!

  11. Greatness: You are Melanie Phillips and I claim my five pounds.

  12. Jock S. Trap 14 Feb 2011, 9:38am

    @ Greatness

    Yes, yes, your and uneducated bore, yada yada….

  13. Paul, you’d be surprised. At least one PinkNews readers is one of the men to be convicted and punished by this past law. He commented a dehumanizing story of what it was like for the government to carry out things like “gay tests” – the courts able to legally perform cavity searches for gayvidence, as I call it. You can read it in the last story about this topic.

  14. Does anyone remember ‘Operation Spanner’? I wonder if those poor sods will have their convictions deleted…

  15. Dan Filson 1 Mar 2011, 8:24pm

    The Protection of Freedoms Bill 2011 is having its Commons 2nd reading today and doesn’t expunge of itself a single conviction, let alone of those now dead. A person “may apply to the Secretary of State for the conviction or caution to become a disregarded conviction or caution” but, as I expected, the Secretary of State has to be satisfied that the other party consented to the act and was a person over the age of 16; and any such conduct now would not be an offence under section 71 Sexual Offences Act 2003 (sexual activity in a public lavatory). I can see the latter being a problem in some cases, where loitering was in effect the offence; perhaps records no longer show exactly where the loitering occurred.
    Given the need to make application rather than for offences to be expunged by executive action, I suspect few will apply. Moreover I suspect some may believe their convictions expunged and commit a further offence of failing to disclose or find their visas to the USA etc barred.

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