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Trans woman performs DIY castration

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  1. Dionysian 5 Jan 2011, 4:02pm

    Having been good friends with several transgendered people (and having had a long term relationship with one) I know how frustrating it can be to have to jump through the hoops. Unfortunately, these safeguards are there for a reason – the highest rate of post-op suicide is in the first 6 months after surgery. They have to make sure the person really knows that this is what they need before undertaking irreversible life changing surgery. (yes, after about 6-8 months on the hormones certain things are never going to be the same, but it isn’t as drastic as going under the knife)

    Whilst I can’t condone self medication or self-surgery, I fully understand the frustration. My only hope is that this person has not done themselves any damage that may hamper the results of any future reassignment surgery.

  2. @dionysian, actualy, for ftm trans people, hormone therapy is much less reversable and often time more “extreme” than surgery.
    For trans women I do understand your point, however, some of the nhs measures arn’t up to scratch at all.

    I’m a trans man and I’ve thought of self medication many times, luckily I had the will power to wait it out and I should be starting hrt very soon, even though I would prefer a mastectomy first the nhs won’t allow it.
    Like I said, all treatment of GID needs to be improved, and from what I’ve seen of the DSM-5 that is due in 2012, we’re heading in the right direction.

  3. from what I’ve seen of the DSM-5 that is due in 2012, we’re heading in the right direction.

    Have you read Blanchards contribution to the DSM V Tom?

    its a major step backwards for all non TS trans people.

  4. That takes some balls to do that!

  5. Dear God. I cannot contemplate the desperation that poor person must have been going through to do that.

    Were they let down by the services, or did they just simply fall through the net?

  6. Hard to say spanner, but you’re absolutely right. I have nothing but sympathy for them and I really do hope they haven’t damaged themselves in any way that’ll make their transition even harder. But doing that without painkillers, fucc me…

  7. > A transgender woman in North Derbyshire was so determined to
    > have sex reassignment surgery, she performed a DIY castration.

    That definitively makes her transsexual, not transgender.

    > The patient, 22, waited 24 hours before going to hospital, the
    > Sheffield Star reports.
    >
    > She is understood to have been determined to undergo sex
    > reassignment surgery and did not use an anaesthetic.
    >
    > She told doctors that the process hurt less than she expected as
    > they treated the wound and offered psychiatric help.

    Offered psychiatric help? As in attempted to get her sectioned you mean? Wound?

    > A spokesman for Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Trust said: “A
    > man [sic] in his early twenties presented himself at the
    > hospital minus his testicles, which he had removed the previous
    > day.
    >
    > “He was treated, then discharged.

    So that’s a remarkably lucky outcome. But will her GP now recognise that she now required hormones as a matter of clinical necessity?

    Another NHS trust with not the faintest idea of how to handle transsexual people; not even the pronouns to use. Yet only a few miles from a long-established gender clinic, in Sheffield, the staff of which waste much of their time doing uselessly biased “research” and attending international conferences; time that might be better spent making other NHS trusts in the region more friendly to their patients. But then, of course, the way NHS empire-buliding, and related patient abuse works, the incentive is the opposite – to make it that everywhere else is unfriendly.

    > “We can say no more because of patient confidentiality – but
    > this is pretty unusual.”
    >
    > Referrals for medical treatment of transgenderism can take
    > months…

    Years, in that part of the country.

  8. Dionysian:
    > Unfortunately, these safeguards are there for a reason – the
    > highest rate of post-op suicide is in the first 6 months after
    > surgery. They have to make sure the person really knows that
    > this is what they need before undertaking irreversible life
    > changing surgery.

    Do you any references for that slur on people who have SRS, on the surgeons, and all others involved in the screening, or are you just repeating the harmful myths used by anti-SRS campaigners in transgenderworld?

  9. Tom:
    > all treatment of GID needs to be improved, and from what I’ve
    > seen of the DSM-5 that is due in 2012, we’re heading in the
    > right direction.

    How do you link proposed changes to the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual to improved _treatment_ in the UK? Especially given that the article is about someone self-castrating and the DSM is still proposed to class the need for such surgery as a mental disorder?

  10. OrtharRrith 6 Jan 2011, 11:48am

    “highest rate of post-op suicide is in the first 6 months after surgery”

    I too would like to know where this information is coming from. As I transwoman myself, I have to say that; whilst the first 6 months are – shall we say – somewhat painful (that’s my downplaying the initial pain somewhat) there was never any thought of suicide – it was actually a pretty exciting and delightful time, despite the pain; as it meant my body finally matched my identity. Much the same has been said by every other transwoman I have spoken to.

    Such suicides as you claim, would suggest that GRS is not successful and I can assure you that it is. Over 98% successful infact.

  11. Christine Beckett 6 Jan 2011, 12:03pm

    Dionysian said…”the highest rate of post-op suicide is in the first 6 months after surgery. ”

    Well, that’s a rather specious claim.

    I’d love to see the figures that back it up.

    In two years of deep research into my condition, and the medical implications of dealing with it, I have never come across it that “fact”.

    Hugs
    chrissie
    xxx

  12. Jen Marcus 6 Jan 2011, 3:22pm

    Cases like this are a product of ignorance of society and its institutions as to the plight and painful internal conflict and suffering experienced by transgender people. The fact that a transgender person is in so much psychological pain that she has to resort to a dangerous, painful and unskilled surgical procedure by her own hand to correct her congenital condition is tragic and inexcusable. The archaic screening and GRS surgical system that exists today must be changed before more frustrated and suffering transgender people either destroy themselves by self help mutilation, or suicide. I also, question the statistics about post-op transgender people committing suicide within 6 months of surgery. The post-op transgender people that I know and deal with are quite happy with themselves and their new lives because they finally feel totally complete and integrated being in their correct gender.

  13. The problem is not the lack of help available, its the social stigma of being trans (often reinforced within the pages of the sun and the daily mail) that stops people seeking help for the condition. I knew I had the wrong body from the age of 5, but I did not seek help until I was 34. I had several breakdowns and suicide attempts but I still could not tell people of the real me.

    Society tells you its not socially acceptable to be trans and the media reinforces that with cruel reporting. Currently the suicide rate for transgender people stands at 34%. I cant help thinking if we could end the social stigma then the average age of trans people seeking treatment would fall from the current figure of 42 years old. Reducing the average age people first present to a doctor would undoubtedly see less people taking desperate measures to ease the pain of gender dysphoria.

    1. Couldn’t agree more Helen. I managed to struggle to the age of 30 hating myself and my body, and going through severe bouts of depression and one suicide attempt before I finally sought medical help after pouring my heart out one evening to one very sympathetic woman on the Manchester Gay switchboard. She probably saved my life, but she never knew it.
      Now, 36 years later I am content with a deep sense of inner peace. Thank you to all those people who saved my life so many years ago.

  14. Christina 6 Jan 2011, 7:02pm

    the article does not give enough information to know whether or what help was sought or given prior to the self- castration. It is clear that this person needs support urgently though. If she has not been referred to …a gender soecialist or gender identity clinic, then her GP should refer her asap. There might also be some need for psychological assessment and counselling – if she wasn’t traumatised before, she might be after her DIY surgery. Also, speaking with and meeting other trans people could help enormously. If you know how to contact the trans woman involved, it might be worth passing on the contact details of support groups in the area like:
    - REFLECTIONS, DERBY TRANSGENDER HELPLINE: 07969448916
    - Transcend
    A support group for people who are transgender in Derbyshire This is solely for the support of transgender people, family and …
    http://www.transcend.org.uk/
    - Derbyshire Friend
    Support and advocacy services for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. http://www.gayderbyshire.org.uk/

  15. Christina 6 Jan 2011, 7:11pm

    The most comprehensive survey of the adult trans population in the UK, Engendered Penalties (Press for Change 2007), reports that “Almost 14% of adult trans people have attempted to commit suicide more than twice, and 34.4%, over 1 in 3, reported having attempted suicide at least once as an adult.”

    Here is a link to the full report which paints a bleak picture of life as a trans person in the UK. Discrimination, loss of pay, jobs, family and home, poor health, exclusion from public services, prejudice from doctors etc are all part of the trans experience.
    http://www.its-services.org.uk/silo/files/the-equalities-review.pdf

  16. Thanks Christina! Although it might be worth clarifying (just in case anyone has got the wrong end of the stick, so to speak) that this paper does *not* identify a high suicidality rate for the first 6 months after surgery.

  17. Helen:
    > The problem is not the lack of help available, its the
    > social stigma of being trans (often reinforced within the pages
    > of the sun and the daily mail) that stops people seeking help
    > for the condition. I knew I had the wrong body from the age of
    > 5, but I did not seek help until I was 34. I had several
    > breakdowns and suicide attempts but I still could not tell
    > people of the real me.

    And how is that not a lack of help available?

    > Society tells you its not socially acceptable to be trans and
    > the media reinforces that with cruel reporting.

    So why have thousands of British people been able to transition, some up to 60 years ago? I do sympathise, but at a certain point one should consider seeking assistance for excessive anxiety, to which there are good physical reasons for many male-to-female people being susceptible.

    Might it perhaps be easier to be accepted as a woman than as trans, too? But then many who hesitate until after puberty, or who cannot afford facial feminisation surgery, which ought to be available on the NHS, since the NHS denies intervention at puberty, have no choice.

    .> Currently the
    > suicide rate for transgender people stands at 34%.

    Bad luck posting that immediately adjacent to a referenced statement that 34% is the rate for at least one suicide _attempt_, which is vastly different to suicide success.

    > …I cant help
    > thinking if we could end the social stigma then the average age
    > of trans people seeking treatment would fall from the current
    > figure of 42 years old. Reducing the average age people first
    > present to a doctor would undoubtedly see less people taking
    > desperate measures to ease the pain of gender dysphoria.

    I don’t know where you sourced that figure, but I’m certain it is ridiculously distorted by exclusion of those presenting under 18. And people waiting until they retire, or until children are grown are hardly being mainly held back by stigma

  18. And how is that not a lack of help available?
    ==========================================

    You cant get help until you accept who you are. The NHS cant help you until you tell them. Its not as if it would be seen as ethical to screen kids for signs of them being gender dysphoric.
    ————————————————————————–

    So why have thousands of British people been able to transition, some up to 60 years ago? I do sympathise, but at a certain point one should consider seeking assistance for excessive anxiety, to which there are good physical reasons for many male-to-female people being susceptible.

    Might it perhaps be easier to be accepted as a woman than as trans, too? But then many who hesitate until after puberty, or who cannot afford facial feminisation surgery, which ought to be available on the NHS, since the NHS denies intervention at puberty, have no choice.
    =======================================

    I never said I don’t
    see myself as a woman, but while talking about gender dysphoria you need to give it some kind of label and trans covers a multitude of trans identities.

    You seem to assume many people accept who they are, many repress themselves trying to not be trans. First you need to come to that place of self acceptance and then you can move forward. Many people do know they are TS but spend most of their life’s resting it.
    —————————————————————————
    Bad luck posting that immediately adjacent to a referenced statement that 34% is the rate for at least one suicide _attempt_, which is vastly different to suicide success.
    ==========================================
    You assume every suicide has to be successful to be called suicide. I took 100 Ibuprofen tablets along with half a bottle of Vodka, I went to sleep thinking I would never wake up again. Obviously I did wake up very ill the next day but it was still suicide attempted.

    But you need to ask yourself was it bad luck that it only turned out to only be a attempt.

    Bad choice of words that oatc.
    —————————————————————————–

    I don’t know where you sourced that figure, but I’m certain it is ridiculously distorted by exclusion of those presenting under 18. And people waiting until they retire, or until children are grown are hardly being mainly held back by stigma
    ============================================
    The age of 42 was the average age treatment was started in the 2009 GIERS report for the government. Nobody is ever see as starting treatment until they are 18 by the NHS. Late transitioners have every right to be included in the figures too.

    OATC You sound like one of those HBS idiots who thinks anyone who transitions after 21 is not a true transsexual.

  19. Helen:
    > You cant get help until you accept who you are.

    Although mental help on the NHS is not adequate, most of it it aimed at helping people resolve issues. Thinking you need to have diagnosed your own issues before seeking help (through the NHS or privately) is classic, over-anxious, depressive prevarication.

    > Its not as if it would be seen as
    > ethical to screen kids for signs of them being gender dysphoric.

    It took you until 34. That’s a long way from childhood by anyone’s standards.

    > I never said I don’t see myself as a woman, but while talking
    > about gender dysphoria you need to give it some kind of label
    > and trans covers a multitude of trans identities.

    But is very unhelpful when specifics are relevant.

    > You assume every
    > suicide has to be successful to be called suicide.

    It does. Because many attempts are really calls for help, and exaggerating the actual numbers just leads to general disbelief.

    >> I don’t know where you sourced that figure, but I’m certain it is
    >> ridiculously distorted by exclusion of those presenting under
    >> 18. And people waiting until they retire, or until children are
    >> grown are hardly being mainly held back by stigma
    >
    > The age of 42 was the average age treatment was started in the
    > 2009 GIERS report for the government. Nobody is ever see as
    > starting treatment until they are 18 by the NHS.

    You said it was the age of seeking treatment, not receiving it. There can be no question but that many seek treatment long before 18. GIRES documents are not gospel.

    > Late
    > transitioners have every right to be included in the figures
    > too.

    But, as I said, not necessarily included as having been delayed by stigma.

    > OATC You sound like one of those HBS idiots who thinks anyone
    > who transitions after 21 is not a true transsexual.

    Don’t be so insulting. I’m correcting your assertions because people need facts. Trying to turn it into a matter of personal abuse doesn’t help.

  20. thank goodness I don’t live in the UK; the difficulty in getting the simplest level of care for this is deeply troubling and the unnecessary demands they make are simply cruel.

  21. Isn’t it odd that I found this news report while looking for a method to achieve the same ends.
    For the record I’m 36 very masculine but have felt trapped since the age or 6-8 when I realised that my sister and I weren’t in fact the same…
    Then going through puberty when cross dressing became almost sexual and being known as a weirdo & pervert for the same.
    Now at 36 I’ve given up on the doctors who cannot or will not help, and am going to comit suicide through self castration… if I survive and really I’ve seen enough steers being done to know with proper care it’s possible to survive… I’ll be one step closer to being able to like myself…

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