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One half of Malawian couple is seeking asylum in Canada

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  1. Julian Morrison 7 Oct 2010, 1:18pm

    Mis-gendering fail. Yet again.

    From Wikipedia :

    The International Women’s Health Coalition,[14] OSISA, and Gender Dynamix,[15] identified the imprisonment of Tiwonge, in particular, as an issue of transphobia due to the fact that Tiwonge identifies as a woman and dresses in women’s clothing; the groups criticized international media reporting of the trial and sentencing due to the fact that most outlets did not observe Tiwonge’s gender identity in their direction of attention to the issue of marriage equality for same-sex couples.

    That would be you, Mr or Ms Staff Writer.

  2. pink news is the daily mail of gay news headlines before facts

  3. @julian Morrison
    You can write anything on Wikipedia. Notions of gender and sexuality in African communities do not fit into Western pigeonholes.

  4. Julian Morrison 7 Oct 2010, 2:42pm

    @Dromio so how about you take the word of Tiwonge, who self-describes as a woman, and is Malawian.

  5. Without insulting each other, in some more traditional societies, the notion of men being attracted to men, especially those opting for a non penetrative sexual role, is a very controversial issue that’s generally associated with a lack of masculinity. In this context it’s easy for men to start thinking they must be women in men’s bodies. That being said, I have no knowledge of Tiwonge’s specific case but it’s true that we shouldn’t always assume that our western ideas surrounding gender can export very easily to diffent cultures.
    I believe I heard that Iran, for instance, has among the highest number of men transitioning to the opposite gender because this is seen as fixing the problem of homosexuality.

  6. Val you make the assumption that homosexual sex is based on penetration you need an education

    dromio what qualifies you to make that statement?

  7. Dean, given your 2-second approach to the issue and lack of a point, I’m not sure I’m the one who needs an education. If you don’t understand what I’ve said, I’m sorry, I can’t be any clearer.

  8. Dean, what qualifies you to make that statement?

  9. Sally Outen 8 Oct 2010, 9:30am

    OK, so social differences surrounding the interpretation of sexuality and gender exist. Tiwonge may be, by our standards, either gay or trans. Therefore, the only thing we have to go on is *Tiwonge’s* standards – the only thing that matters where her personal identity is concerned. Tiwonge has made clear that she identifies as a woman, and that should be honoured, regardless of any implied idea that her understanding of gender and sexuality is less sophisticated than your own.

  10. @Dromio “Notions of gender and sexuality in African communities do not fit into Western pigeonholes.” I think your sentence is just one of those self-exonerating things Mugabe says. Like ‘its un-african to be gay, bla bla bla’. We are talking of human beings not some ‘made-in-China’ factory product.

    Agreed or not, and regardless of what labels is put on them, it comes down to one thing; how the person in question feels and what they enjoy and want to do.

    African culture or not, some people in Africa like in all other places world over are homosexual (someone who is sexually attracted to same sex), etc.

    Culture is the moral lie people impose on others to oppress them and suppress their self-worth, confidence and personality. These oppressors are actually, in most cases, living in self-pity and denial (of reality).

  11. Clearly someone does not want to be ‘de-gayed’ by the state.

    Good for him.

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