Mexico’s Supreme Court has ruled that gay marriages must be recognised throughout the country.

The country’s capital, Mexico City, legalised marriage for gay couples seven months ago.

The ruling, backed by nine of the 11 judges, does not force the rest of the country to hold marriage ceremonies for gay couples, but means other jurisdictions must recognise them.

This means that gay couples from other parts of Mexico can go to the capital to wed and receive all of the rights and benefits of marriage at home.

Last week, the court ruled that legalising gay marriage in the capital was constitutional.

It will now decide whether a provision allowing gay couples to adopt children is legal.

Mexico’s Catholic church and President Felipe Calderon’s conservative government both opposed the law.

Last month, Argentina became the first country in Latin America to allow same-sex marriage.