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Ugandan Bishop speaks out against homophobia

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  1. He condemned the ‘Death to Gays’ bill in Dublin.

    Well that’s nice I suppse.

    But how is he campaigning against the bill in his native Uganda.

    Condemning the bill in Dublin is all very well but it is preaching to the converted.

    Archbishop Rowan Williams showed how pathetic and cowardly and immoral the Anglican hierarchy were through his total silence on the ‘Kill the Gays’ bill. However he was instant in his condemnation of the ordination of a lesbian bishop.

    I want to see Christopher Senyonjo going to Uganda and condemning the bill there.

    That’s where he can be of assistance. He is merely engaging in meaningless PR by condemning it in Europe.

    Who’s betting that the spineless wretch won’t condemn the bill when he is in Uganda.

  2. I’m an atheist and I have a negative view of all religions generally. However, I always thought of mainstream Christianity as being SLIGHTLY more humane and decent than, for example, Islam. I say this because you have principles in Christianity, such as ‘hate the sin, love the sinner’, ‘turn the other cheek’, ‘the one who has never sinned throw the first stone’, ‘god is love’ and et cetera.

    Now, bearing this in mind, I don’t understand why Christian clergypeople in Uganda and similar places, especially the Anglican ones, even if they regard hhomosexual sexual relationships to be morally flawed, can’t easily condemn the disgusting and hateful Ugandan Anti-Homosexuality Bill.

  3. If they dont hurt anyone why the hate? they can “eat da pupu” for all i care!
    but killing them is out of q.

  4. Good to hear someone religious speak out about this hate bill
    Well done Christopher Senyonjo! =]

  5. The Anglican cult are condemning the bill in Europe and the US (only after massive pressure was put on them) but they are refusing to condemn it un Uganda. The Anglican church in Uganda is actively supporting the bill.

    Rowan Williams has not threatened to kick the Anglican Church in Uganda out of the church due to their support of this genocidal law.

    It shows how morally bankrupt the Anglican church it, that church unity is regarded as more important than human lives.

    Has this Christopher Senyonjo character been to his native Uganda and unequivocally condemned this bill as unchristian, murderous and wrong?

    If not then I hope he was pelted with eggs when he was engaging in his PR-inspired condemnation in Dublin.

  6. No 4: Tigra: “Good to hear someone religious speak out about this hate bill. Well done Christopher Senyonjo! =] ”

    But Christopher Senyonjo’s condemnation is utterly meaningless and dishonest when you realise that he is not condemning it in Uganda, where his condemnation could do some good.

    Condemning it in Europe is merely engaging in PR. Everyone in Europe realises that the bill is murderous, savage and immoral.

    Why is he not in Uganda condemning it there?

    Because church unity is more important to the Anglican cult than human lives.

  7. Patrick James 24 Jun 2010, 3:57pm

    SamB writes:

    I’m an atheist and I have a negative view of all religions generally. However, I always thought of mainstream Christianity as being SLIGHTLY more humane and decent than, for example, Islam. I say this because you have principles in Christianity, such as ‘hate the sin, love the sinner’, ‘turn the other cheek’, ‘the one who has never sinned throw the first stone’, ‘god is love’ and et cetera.

    Like you I am an atheist but I do not think that Christianity can be said to be even slightly more humane and decent than say Islam as you suggest.

    A large part of this could be that I grew up in Northern Ireland so I saw Christianity in quite a violent form.

    I don’t think that faiths in themselves contain a great deal of difference between violent and peaceful messages in their ideologies, even if they do I don’t think it makes much difference to the outcome, whether their adherents would be violent or not.

    What matters is the political situation of the faith in the current day and how its leaders seek to interpret and present the faith in given situations.

    At present there is a great deal of suggestion that Islam is a religion given to violence for example.

    Historically though Christianity hugely eclipses all other religions for violent actions performed in its name. This doesn’t mean that I’m suggesting that Christianity is inherently more violent than Islam, rather that for a lengthy historical period it was useful for powerful individuals to interpret Christianity in a violent way.

    The right wing tabloid papers love to focus on Islam as presenting a violent threat, but here in the UK in the last few decades it is Christian extremist terrorism that has been a far greater problem, coming of course from Northern Ireland.

    For the average Islamic person the terrorists of Afghanistan are much further away culturally and philosophically than a Northern Irish terrorist is from the average English person, and yet an atmosphere is unfortunately created in the UK by the right wing tabloids that perhaps all Islamic people are a potential threat.

  8. I think this is the guy who was been sacked by the Anglican Church in Uganda (which appears to be rabidly, some possibly violently, anti-gay) for working and counselling amongst gay people and being against the “Death to the Gays and Their Friends” Bill. Because of his stance he has become a pariah in Uganda. It has cost him his livelihood and possibly endangered his life.

  9. First things first, religion continues to cause many problems in the world.

    However, I discovered that Bishop Christopher Senyonjo is a true ally of the LGBT community and speaks out both in Africa and across the world.

    Standing by the LGBT community has placed him in direct confrontation with the political/religious anti-gay movements.

    His pension was stripped by the Episcopal Church of Uganda, but he continues to speak up for the community and therefore is a true friend to us all.

    We must remember that whilst it takes great courage to be gay in Africa, it also takes a great deal of courage to be a straight, Christian supporter of equality.

    We must also remember that whilst we can fight this struggle on our own, we can never win it without the help of people like Christopher Senyonjo and our other straight friends.

  10. D Lambert is right about this guy (though I think the church is called Anglican everywhere except the US – I could be wrong). Plus I should add he is 78 years old. And he supports gay marriage. There is more information about him here:

    http://www.xtra.ca/public/National/Elderly_bishop_rocks_Ugandas_gay_rights_movement-8359.aspx

    Excerpt:

    Bishop Christopher established his one-man counselling service in 1998 and soon after, got his first gay client.

    “I listened to him,” says Christopher, who never stops smiling. “That was strange for the man. Most people just told homosexuals they should change.”

    One gay client led to another, until all hell broke loose. In 2001, Uganda’s two dozen other bishops — including the Archbishop — found out Christopher was comforting homosexuals.

    While Christopher was on a trip overseas, he was thrown out of the bishop’s circle, kicked out of his parish and denied his pension.

    “I lost a lot of privileges,” he says. He was also pilloried in the press. “I stayed in the US for six months, for fear to come back.”

    When he did, strangers called him names and his Anglican colleagues shunned him — even the ones who told him they secretly agreed with his views.

    Still, Christopher has no regrets. “God wants me to help oppressed peoples,” he insists. “Homosexuals should enjoy all the rights and benefits that heterosexuals enjoy.”

    For Christopher, that includes marriage — a particularly blasphemous point of view in conservative Uganda.”

  11. At last an anglican bishop with balls. Admittedly they’re too small for him to support gays at home. But that’s better than the idiot Williams who won’t support gays anywhere now that his milch-cow, the evangelicals and Africans especially, have declared themselves against homosexuality.

  12. “But Christopher Senyonjo’s condemnation is utterly meaningless and dishonest when you realise that he is not condemning it in Uganda, where his condemnation could do some good.”
    They are clearly a backwards people from even contemplating this law and their weirdo cergy who show gay porn to people in church
    Going there and speaking for gay rights will probably get him arrested or worse and could even get him sacked

    So i stand by my statement that his condemnation for their hate laws is a good thing.
    … Always better than praising them

  13. Dave Donnellan 24 Jun 2010, 9:37pm

    I have met Christopher Senyonjo and I can vouch that he is a person of the highest integrity and has personally paid a very high price for his support for LGBT people in his native Uganda. His family in Uganda have had to move several times due to threats he has received due to his support for LGBT and his opposition to the Anti-Homosexuality Bill in Uganda. His fellow bishops have shunned him and refused to provide him with any work which is the one of the only ways a retired bishop can provide for himself. He is a strong and valuable ally of the LGBT community worldwide and deserves our every support.

  14. I believe the Anglicans should sack Archbishop Rowan Williams and make Bishop Christopher Senyonjo the head of the church. That might satisfy some of the Africans and take some of the steam out of their campaign of feeling sorry for themselves. It would put a decent man at the helm and get rid of a weakling and opportunist like Rowan Williams. It might totally change the dynamics of this problem.

  15. He won’t live long in Uganda

  16. Sister Mary Clarance 25 Jun 2010, 8:35am

    So we seem to have moved here from this guy being a spineless flake in the first posting to an acknowledgment that the guy has been a long time outspoken critic of homophobia both at home abroad.

    I wonder if that revelation might actually discourage anyone (and I mean Simon here or whatever pen name he is now assuming) from jumping in with both feet throwing abuse at people he knows next to nothing about, and who don’t actually deserve it.

    Probably not I suspect ….

  17. It is kind of strange that some people don’t bother to read the other comments giving the facts about this kind, extremely brave elderly guy. He WAS sacked for counselling gay people in Uganda. Also worth noting that under the proposed law he would face the death sentence for aggravated homosexuality for counselling gays and not reporting them ( if he did it more than once), alternatively prison for advocating equality for them.

  18. It is also partly the fault of the lack of detail in the article, which also grossly understates the effect of the bill. The standard of journalism could be better.

  19. Sister Mary Clarance 25 Jun 2010, 11:13am

    Eight to be fair I don’t think pinknews can be expected to produce a resume of this guy’s life, but if people are going to slag others off for doing, or not doing, something they should maybe check they have, or have not, done them.

    It is generally the same few that have such a chip on their shoulder that the victim/siege mentality kicks in and overrides reason.

  20. “It is generally the same few that have such a chip on their shoulder that the victim/siege mentality kicks in and overrides reason. ”
    Right on Sister! =]
    I hope im never such a miserable old git that i can’t even appreciate when someone does good for our cause
    Especially since he’s done more than the wingers here

  21. I agree with you in principle, Robbie.

    Though, unfortunately, new leadership is not terribly likely. These are the same people who passed on Desmond Tutu – a Nobel laureate and media superstar who could have revitalised the church – in favor of stodgy old George Carey. They don’t have a good track record when it comes to choosing leaders.

  22. You can thank my country – the USA and its so called evangelical christians of the old south who gave us slavery and segregation for hte scene in Uganda.

    REligion here has become an export economy. the product is called hate.

    If they pass that bill, perfhaps a 10000 # bomb – just one – would deliver justice to their parliment.

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