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Irish trans woman wins battle to be recognised as female

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  1. Stuart Neyton 21 Jun 2010, 5:18pm

    Such a shame that people have to go through the court system to get these rights, but fantastic news nonetheless.

  2. Hopefully the law won’t just recognise the gender of those who have gender reallignment surgery. Any law needs to rcognise the difference between gender and sex. The U.K. Gender Recognition Act 2004, despite its two flaws including the messy process of moving from marriage to civil partnership, is an excellet piece of legislation.

  3. Paschal:
    > Hopefully the law won’t just recognise the gender of those
    > who have gender reallignment surgery.

    How can something inborn – our sense of gender – be “realligned” by surgery? They tried such brain surgery in Hitler’s camps and it didn’t work.

    The surgery (for those who have it done) changes sex because our gender is unchangeable and cannot live with a body that is so at odds. For those who change gender and who don’t need surgery, it is their gender that is being recognised.

  4. Paschal:
    > …The U.K. Gender
    > Recognition Act 2004, despite its two flaws including the messy
    > process of moving from marriage to civil partnership, is an
    > excellet piece of legislation.

    The GRA is widely regarded as a total disaster that delivered a sick parody of the rights required in European law after the Goodwin judgement. Let me list some other failings of the GRA:
    * Under-18s denied documentation.
    * Mental disorder diagnosis required even after SRS – even though ECHR stated SRS was evidence enough.
    * Required to state one has a “new gender” even if transition was decades ago or gender was inborn.
    * 2 year wait even though SRS can be had in 6 months.
    * Re-traumatising new mental assessment required in order to provide a file of very intimate details (sexual partners, masturbation, fantasies, sexual surgery) that is kept permanently.
    * No sealing of or requirement to update old records.

    more…

  5. Oatc, I know the difference between gender and sex. The term ”gender reallignememnt” is commonly used. It was used in an Irish tv news report of the issue yesterday.

  6. Paschal:
    > The term “gender reallignememnt” is commonly used. It was used in an Irish tv news
    > report of the issue yesterday

    That doesn’t make it a meaningful term. How, please, could something inborn and unchangeable be realigned – which basically means changed in direction? Indeed it was most likely meant to be “reassigned”, which means re-labeled in the context of gender being misused as a synonym for “sex”, which it isn’t. But saying gender is re-labeled is nowhere near as harmful as claiming to have changed an essential, core element of a person’s identity.

    UK law uses the “gender reassignment” because, when the GRA was passed, the UK government, having been obliged to provide legal documentation, but with Catholics in all relevant positions, was following Vatican policy in still denying, as it had in court case after court case, that sex could ever change, and thus tried to make out that words could mean whatever it said they meant and made out it was replacing “sex” with “gender” throughout UK law. The civil servant in charge of the bill spelled this out to me personally. It was simply transphobia.

    All of these terms that hinge around something about gender changing, or being variable, or confused, are transphobic in denying that our gender was inborn. Whilst for some people it may not to seem to have been, and they may feel they have made a lifestyle choice, for some, especially those who were transsexual from our first memories, it clearly was. Denying that it was assists all those who cause such harm by refusing to accept that identity, or even trying to change it.

  7. An eighth attempt to complete posting the list of problems with the UK Gender Recognition Act (on top of its appalling treatment of those already in marriages or civil partnerships):
    * Issue of new, 2nd birth certificate make discovery through online indexes easy.
    * New certificate is easily identified as due to GRA.
    * Listing on a central register open to many agencies and of unknown security – probably illegal under european data protection law since those rounding up prisoners for the camps would have found it very convenient.
    * No provision for UK-born people settled overseas where do not have “approved” specialists and intermediate certificates are not recognised by divorce courts.
    * Visitors to UK have to get new UK recognition or else are legally their birth sex whilst in UK.
    * Privacy protections are misleadingly thin and almost unenforceable.
    * Equality laws largely ignore the act when providing “protection” for transphobes.

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