BNP leader Nick Griffin unveiled his party’s manifesto today in Stoke.

Accompanied by a man in a St George’s Day themed-costume, Mr Griffin told supporters: “Britain is full. It’s the most overcrowded country in Europe. It’s time to shut the doors.”

The party won two seats in last year’s European elections and Mr Griffin hopes his party can capitalise on this by putting its first MP in the House of Commons.

The manifesto calls for an end to immigration from Muslim nations, saying that it presents “deadly threats” to Britain.

It also calls for the immediate deportation of radical Islamist preachers and a halt to all further immigration.

The party claims it is not racist, although it was recently forced by the courts to amend its whites-only membership rules.

The manifesto says that the BNP would repeal the Race Relations Act and ban “far leftist social engineering projects” such as the Equalities and Human Rights Commission.

It also promises to “repeal all laws aimed at restricting freedom of speech, including those relating to race relations and religion”.

Presumably, this would include laws drawn up to stamp out homophobic hatred.

While the document makes several references to the “traditional family”, none of the party’s views on homosexuality are included.

Senior party members have shown varying levels of homophobia in recent years.

Mr Griffin said last month that the BNP was far less anti-gay than previously, although he maintained that civil partnerships should be banned and homosexuality should not be mentioned in schools.

On health, the party says it would introduce a “public health awareness campaign on the dangers of high-risk, unsafe sex, aimed at combating AIDS and HIV”.

Other pledges included leaving the European Union, banning the burka and bringing back the death penalty.

Mr Griffin hopes to become the party’s first MP and is standing in the London borough of Barking, where his party’s councillors are the opposition group on the council.

Earlier today, Conservative Party leader David Cameron called for people to reclaim St George’s Day from the BNP.

Speaking at an event with London Mayor Boris Johnson, he said: “Today we are celebrating St George’s Day, and we are reclaiming St George’s Day as an important day I think for good reasons.

“And one of the most important reasons is that we should be reclaiming the flag from the BNP and saying the flag belongs to the English people, all of them.”

This week, Marmite said it would sue the BNP for using an image of the product in a broadcast. The party was apparently trying to use the product’s slogan of “you’ll either love it or you’ll hate it”.