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Glee actor hopes gay teens can identify with his character

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  1. Identify with that 2-dimentional silly little queen of an excuse for a character? I hope not!

  2. ChutneyBear 12 Apr 2010, 4:23pm

    Agreed ….

  3. identify with yet another sterotype??!?

  4. Zefrog: Maybe it’s a stereotype, but come on, just look at the commentators on here. They are all two-dimensional silly little queens as well. Art imitates life.

  5. I just hope they don’t make Kurt Hummel another Chris Crocker. It’s flamboyant loud gays like Crocker that give the LGBT community a bad name.

  6. “I decided to play him the way I do because there are a lot of over-the-top flamboyant loud characters like Kurt on TV.”

    But what about outside the fictional landscape of TV, Chris?

    Rather than challenge gay stereotypes, the most camp programme on television would rather trot-out the same old tired extremes – a screaming, effeminate mincer – who’s depth of character amounts to speaking in a nasal pitch, giving girls makeovers, and being altogether bitchy and standoffish (and that’s the “positive” gay representation – the other is a middle-aged paedophile. A paedophile, for god’s sake!) Was ‘Glee’ created using a ‘How To’ guide to appease the US Right Wing? Despite our own vast shortcomings (equivalent ethnic stereotypes would surely be banned), in comparison the UK has set the bar fairly high. Now, If only Alan Carr and our other gay “figures of fun” realised they were being laughed AT, instead of WITH (like bullying, there’s a huge distinction). Like Black and White Minstrels, our time entertaining bigots has long since passed. In this day and age only those with especially low self-esteem would allow themselves to be.

  7. Speaking as a “loud, flamboyant gay” Felipe the gay rights movement takes it lead from a bunch of drag queens at Stonewall. Go read your gay history, from Stonewall to Lavender Panthers, out gay flamboyant men, women and trans with no where and no wish to hide have been at the forefront on our battles for gay rights. Our community should embrace all of it’s constituents and to criticise those of us who identify as camp is self loathing at worse or just plain mean spirited at best. Fact is, many gay men are effeminate, love musicals and many gay women are butch and love trucks – big deal! Glee shows a gutsy gay guy who’s father loves him, who is genuinely talented and believes in himself – attributes many gay kids would aspire too…

  8. I went to high school with a ton of loud, proud, flamboyant gay guys like Kurt on Glee. I think they deserve to have some representation on television, too. Yes, it would be irresponsible of the media to ONLY depict feminine, flamboyant gay men and never the less-obvious type. But it would be equally irresponsible to run away from the stereotype and only depict gay men who are stereotypically straight-acting. Some people actually do fit the stereotype, fellas.

  9. What a load of B.S on this forum – last time I checked the very notion of being gay challenges heterosexuals’ dominant definitions of masculinity and femininity and the social norms of love and relationships. Sexual orientation, gender identity and your masculinity are all hard wired guys – otherwise you are on the same side as the “conversion therapy” idiots. We should be supportive of every flaming queen in our community otherwise you are reinforcing rather then challenging a cultural system that will always mark the gay effeminate man as inferior. That’s a core value to our Queer Movement guys..

  10. Stewart: The problem with that line of thinking is that the reinforced stereotype of the effeminate gay man does nothing for the rest of us. “You can’t be gay! You’re not mincing!”

    As long as society continues to pigeonhole us, then we have to try to break that mould by demonstrating we are just as varied and eclectic as any other section of society.

    I spent the first thirty years of my life convinced I wasn’t gay because the only gay men I knew of were the likes of John Inman and Larry Grayson, and I thought “I’m not like that, so I can’t be gay.” Some definitions deserve to be smashed.

  11. I’m glad Chris spoke out. His words make me feel a whole lot better about my own similar situation

  12. I guess stereotypes exist in real-life, but I bet there aren’t too many of them. I’d much rather see gay teenagers aspiring to better role-models instead of this character, who is exactly that, a character and a rather poorly-penned one at that. Surely we can do better.

  13. In real life there are gay people and in Internet life there are queens. Gay people are. And queens are what comes out when everywhere is safe to claim victory. “gays in history”

  14. @Robn The way you comment here I suppose that explains alot. The amount of self hate on here is appalling. I’ve never been effeminate but I’ve never seen it as anything to be ashamed of and although I usually crush on more masculine men I do, occassionally, GASP find effeminate men attractive. It’s nearly as if gay had two subspecies the way you people are talking. Gay is gay and when youre on your knees sucking some guys dick it doesn’t matter if you watch football or ice skating, you’re still a faggot to the bigots. There’s such a desire to assimilate into straight culture that we feel the need to abandon those gay men who couldn’t hide who they were and were forced to stand and fight. Without them we’d never be where we are today.

  15. Pumpkin Pie 13 Apr 2010, 2:15am

    Wow, there’s some real sour grapes here. A campy, caricaturish gay kid on a campy, caricaturish musical drama? How inconcievable!

    Kids like this character need all the support they can get. You can’t act like this and stay in the closet. You either have to live a lie, or you end up as a walking target. I didn’t realise I was bi until after my teens. Was that a result of a lack of role models I could identify with? Probably. And I certainly would like to see more variety out there, but comparing what I had to go through (delayed self-realisation – boo-****ing-hoo) to the abuse the camp kids had to endure, I think any initiative to marginalise the camp types is grossly insensitive. It’s so pathetic the way queers have been trained to say “but I’m not one of those mincing fairy gays” whenever their sexuality is revealed.

    I know what you’re thinking: don’t kids like this ALREADY have enough of these role models? No! What they have is a deluge of grotesque parodies created to entertain the straight folk. This here is a camp character created for camp kids. Kurt’s confidence and comfortableness with himself are the what seperate this character from the queer-face minstrels. This is a camp character who is not a joke. This is not a character that has been created for people to point and laugh at.

    The first time I saw this character on a TV ad, that was what was immediately apparent to me. He made me smile. I’m not even camp and he made me feel happy. Made me wish there were characters like him when I was a kid. Even if I wouldn’t have entirely identified with him, he still would have helped me see just how healthy and happy queer people are. That would have got the ball rolling for me much sooner. To think, I could have spent my teen years being turned down by girls AND boys! <3 Would have been fun. :)

  16. This is a tv show from the USA…
    You only have to look at our own tv shows to see stereotype’s we have here on our soaps. They each have “ONE” Emerdale the young guy that is coming to terms whith who and what he is, Corrie the camp, witty knikker sticher, Eastenders the professional lycra vest wearing plank and if you want somthing that is totaly off the wall look at the characters in shamless

    So there is VARIATY if you look and want to identify with them ?

    You all have an “OFF” button on your remote, it is your choice ?

    I find it sad how some dismiss others becuase they do not conform to thier own way that they wish present themselvs to the world.

    I like the way Chris Colfer has “ACTED OUT” this part It is sharp, witty, intelligent and yes quiet strong.
    Do not underestimate young pepole They are very savy these days having access to a lot mor information from more places than we ever did when we were that age, you only (have to watch skins fron CH4) The world has changed and reading the comments on here SOME people seem to be living in there own past…

  17. Come on people. Many polls have shown that people who know gay people are 25% more likely to support full equal rights for gays.

    Even more important then Marriage equality is breaking down the horrible closet of fear and shame. Be glad this kid is apparently Out.

    Don’t fall victim to complaining about out gay people. Whoever they are, queenies or ultra- machos, or just ordinary people, the more out people the better. By a big margin.

    And if you look on you tube, you’ll see so many kids – the next generation – who support their gay friends. We need everyone out. And the church’s of hate will ultimately be seen as the horror shows of western civilization

  18. Surely we need more ‘ordinary’ gay role models. This kind of character will put a lot of young gay people off ‘coming out’ with the fear of being tainted with this over-the-top character.

    It’s an age old problem that over the top flamboyant loud characters are entertainment but actually only speak for a minority of people.

    TV companies should be more sensitive to how difficult it is for a lot of teenagers to be young and gay. Characters should more reflect that with more to real life characters in which more would associate themselves.

  19. The actor who plays Kurt is very much like Kurt – I’ve seen him being interviewed, he isn’t “Playing” him a particular way, the actor is just as effeminate, campy etc so why not let him just be that same character when he is acting. Its not a straight butch man camping up for a role, its a camp gay kid being himself for a role, really.

    Also, I do think Kurts character is probably transgender to be honest, but anything that deviates from heterosexual norm is considered to be “gay” esp in teens but in fact could just as easily be trans.

  20. DaveP #7….right on, brother!! Finally someone on here knows their stuff!! I am a gay woman who probably should have been a flamboyant gay male,,I love flamboyant men, campy or otherwise,,they add so much thrill to life and make a good time even better! Rock on flamies!! You are what make the gay world gayer and wayyyyyyyyyyyyyy more fun to be around. None of you take yourselves overly serious and I’ve never met a flamer that was stuck on himself! So nice to see someone knows some gay history and actually speaks the truth about it. The gay world did not start up last week!

  21. J: Why is everyone that is gay, but doesn’t go with the gay consensus is deemed “self-hating”? I am quite happy with myself. It’s irritating little lefty tossers like you I despise.

    I certainly don’t differentiate between effeminate or “straight-acting” guys, and have never had a problem with that.

    I just think the majority of gay men are a bunch of selfish, vain, egotistical wankers.

  22. When I was growing up in the 80’s it was always my ‘straight acting’ friends that were in the closet usually with the explanation that their sexuality was ‘no-one elses business’. As Im a little effeminate (only a bit!) I never had that option but it strikes me as sad that those that followed in the wake of more openly gay people are now so eager to disassociate from them. I can understand that some of us are desperate to be accepted as ‘normal’ but I think straight people find ‘straight acting’ gay guys pretty uninteresting and thats why they are not portrayed in the media.

  23. Mihangel apYrs 13 Apr 2010, 2:06pm

    the guy’s gay and he is camp. At least it’s not a straight guy “acting” up as a screamer.

    No doubt his proposed boyfriend will be a butch type to “balance” it.

    And he is quite sweet in his naivety, tho’ he will be eternally stereotyped as “fag”

  24. “I just think the majority of gay men are a bunch of selfish, vain, egotistical wankers.”

    Including yourself in that delightful, yet bitter description, Rob, are we then?

  25. Andy Armitage 13 Apr 2010, 3:34pm

    I think Kurt is an interesting character, and it’s good to see that he wants to make the role into something of a model and to instil confidence into teens. The next series, though, has only fairly recently been commissioned, so won’t be on British TV screens for a while yet, but the continuation of Series One is due to happen in Britain later this month.

  26. to be honest its just yet another sterotypical queer on tv because to the mainstream theyre the only gays that exist.

  27. Funny how the flamboyant, stereotypical ones are the ones who are less scared to show themselves than the more ‘normal’ dare-I-say “straight acting” variety of gays. Until more of the 3D versions stand up and get a higher profile this is how it will be.

    And just look at how many homophobic comments there are on this discussion. Shame on you all for being so self-centred.

    There’s room for us all to be who and how we want to be. The more gay presence there is on TV and in the media the better for all of us because it is becomig more normal and more accepted because of it.

    Chris who plays this character is 19 for heaven’s sake, what experience does he have of the diversity and richness of gay cultures. Good for him for playing it any way he wants.

  28. I absolutely love Chris Colfer, he IS effeminate. But he also shows a soft and vulnerable side- the opposite of loud and bitchy. All the time he puts on a flamboyant facade, to make sure he doesn’t show his vulnerable side to others who will always think he’s a ‘fag’. Being proud and flamboyant may be kind of stereotypical, but it shows that he’s PROUD of being gay. And being proud of who you are is the best kind of representation for gay, right?

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