A Canadian psychiatrist who was known as Doctor Shock for experiments on gay people in apartheid-era South Africa has been accused of sexually abusing a male patient.

Dr Aubrey Levin worked as chief psychiatrist in the country’s military in the 1970s and 1980s. Most of his reported subjects were young white men, some of whom claimed they had been subjected to electric shocks and hormone treatment to ‘cure’ them of homosexuality.

Those who could not be ‘cured’ were instead given chemical castrations and sex changes, it has been claimed.

Levin was also accused of drugging conscientious objectors and soldiers who admitted to marijuana use.

He moved to Calgary 15 years ago and worked at the University of Calgary’s medical school.

He was arrested last week after a 36-year-old patient secretly filmed him allegedly making sexual advances to him and is now on bail.

Levin has been suspended from practising and faces charges of repeatedly indecently assaulting a 36-year-old man.

Police are now reviewing 30 other claims from patients and more men have come forward since the allegations were reported.

Attention will now turn to how he was able to enter Canada and continue practising psychiatry.

South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission was told that he was guilty of “gross human rights abuses” but Levin was able to suppress media attention on his past by threatening lawsuits against newspapers which attempted to delve into the claims.

He denies the human rights abuses and has said that he only treated those who wanted to be cured.

Levin is expected to appear in court of April 8th.