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John Partridge says gay Corrie character is a ‘stereotype’

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  1. Sean Tully may be a stereotype but the Christian Clarke character started out as a different type of stereotype – a muscle-bound, promiscuous, predatory gay guy.

    Stereotypes exist because often they tell the truth about certain aspects of society. The camp queen and the nuscle bound slut are 2 types of stereotypes that exist about gay men.

    Eastenders and Corrie are soaps – they are not meant to be realistic portrayals of urban life (if they were then Albert Square would have been demolished years ago due to its status as the murder capital of Europe)

  2. Eastenders had a gay couple in the past – Simon and Tony. Simon was Tiffany’s brother. And Tony was Tiffany’s ex-boyfriend.

    They were 2 non-stereotypical gay characters.

    Non-stereotypical in the sense that no gay person I have ever met in my 33 years on this planet has ever been so spirit crushingly boring as Simon and Tony were.

  3. Agreed with both the comments above.
    Clearly this is a case of “please move along, nothing to see here”

  4. ChutneyBear 8 Mar 2010, 6:13pm

    Whenever will we get a bloody bear on Corrie or Eastenders! I dont want muscle predators or skinny f**kin queens I want a real man! ;)

  5. This is another one of those Pink News articles where its quotes don’t fit its editorial. It seems he didn’t criticise the Sean Tully character as a stereotype, he simply labelled it so.

    SimonM (1) noted that the Christian Clark character started-out as a stereotype. In fact, what soap actors/actresses do not play the stereotype of whatever part they’re given? That (together with misfortune, disaster, set-up for a fall, and all the negative things in life) defines a soap character.

  6. John(Derbyshire) 8 Mar 2010, 11:33pm

    What I object to is the “gay issue” actually BEING the story line. When that story line has run its course-then the gay characters are “dumped”. Its as though we don`t exist in society unless we are “coming out” or being “found out” for being gay. We don`t seem represented as your usual inhabitant of Corrie or Albert Square or Emmerdale. We certainly don`t sta in any of these places after coming out. No gays exist other than to prvide gay story lines.

  7. John(Derbyshire) said What I object to is the “gay issue” actually BEING the story line. When that story line has run its course-then the gay characters are “dumped”. Its as though we don`t exist in society unless we are “coming out” or being “found out” for being gay. We don`t seem represented as your usual inhabitant of Corrie or Albert Square or Emmerdale. We certainly don`t sta in any of these places after coming out. No gays exist other than to prvide gay story lines.

    True to an extent, but in my opinion Corrie is nowhere near as bad as EastEnders. Sean has been on the soap for years, and so has trans character Hayley. Their sexuality/gender identity are secondary issues and most often not relevant to the stories and plots. The BBC still sees a person’s sexuality as the main thing that defines them.

  8. BrazilBoysBlog 9 Mar 2010, 2:15am

    I am happy that gay characters are portrayed on prime-time soaps at all. i also would prefer these characters to be just a part of the everyday storyline instead of a big ´gay story´… but that´s just me.

    I can´t help but reflect on the fact that gay teenagers can today see gay characters on tea-time soaps (of all stereotypical persuasions) instead of the lack of positive gay people refected on TV when I was a teen.

    When I was growing up, and inquisitive about myself, I was treated to John Innman, Larry Grayson, Quentin Crisp etc… Whilst funny and entertaining, and each has a place in gay TV history, I could not relate to any of them… Was this what ALL gay people were like?

    I wish there had been some of today´s characters on TV back then…

  9. I agree that Corrie’s longterm treatment of its non-straight characters is better than Eastenders. Sean and Hayley are longterm characters not entirely defined by their sexuality or gender identity.

    I fully expect Syed to be written out of Eastenders as soon as his ‘coming out as a gay muslim’ story finishes.

    Remember Dr Fonseca in Eastenders? Thought not.

  10. Also what happened with the Sonia/Naomi storyline was disgraceful. By the way, the actress who played Sonia (Natalie Cassidy) seems quite narrow-minded actually:-

    http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/soaps/s2/eastenders/news/a197691/natalie-cassidy-bemoans-lesbian-storyline.html

  11. No long term lesbian characters though. Hmph :[ always under-represented!

  12. I agree with Natalie Cassidy though. The relationship between Sonia and Naomi was extremely badly handled by the scriptwriters.

    Sonia had NEVER displayed any same-sex attractions in her 13 years on the soap. All her love affairs were with either men (not ignoring her abiding love for her trumpet of course). They seemed to decide overnight ‘Oh let’s make her a lesbian’, and then 2 months later ‘Oooh maybe not, let’s get her back with Martin’.

    Della and Binnie was the only other time Eastenders had a lesbian couple.

  13. Rev Laurie Roberts 9 Mar 2010, 6:23pm

    John Partridge looks tasty geezer in that pic !

  14. Yes, Simon, but then neither did Sonia ever display any sexual attraction to black guys in her 13 years on the soap. If Natalie Cassidy told the magazine that the storyline with Naomi wasn’t right for Sonia because Naomi was black, then most people would think of that as racism.

  15. I don’t think that’s comparable Dave.

    My understanding of Natalie Cassidy’s comments is that she believed the scriptwriters were thinking about storylines for her character, decided suddenly that Sonia was going to be a lesbian, but then a couple of weeks into the storyline decided that it was a bad idea, so immediately reversed their decision and got her character back with Martin.

    I remember when her character got with Naomi, thinking to myself ‘Where on EARTH has this story come from, I wonder where this is going?’. Then a couple of months later switching on thinking ‘Why is Sonia back with Martin and where is Naomi gone?’

    It was a badly conceived, badly written and badly executed storyline.

  16. By the way, Natalie Cassidy announced her intention to leave EE within a week of the lesbian storyline starting on TV.

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