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Italian footballer player could be punished for gay magazine shoot

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  1. Mrs Patrick Campbell 5 Jan 2010, 8:53pm

    This story is meaningless without full frontal nude photos!

  2. the.kitty.channel 5 Jan 2010, 9:13pm

    The internet is awash with photos of Datolo dressed as skimpily as you please, thought not – admittedly – naked.

    What I think does make this story meaningless is that of course Italy is full of red-blooded heterosexual males, like Aurelio Dinosauris, there simply aren’t any gay people there at all. That’s obvious, innit. And even if there were, well males should only pose for female-interest mags, it stands to reason, because of course gay men, if there were any, wouldn’t buy *them*.

    (Irony alert).

  3. the.kitty.channel 5 Jan 2010, 9:14pm

    Ahem, erratum: “though”, not “thought”. Sorry.

  4. Simon Murphy 5 Jan 2010, 10:00pm

    Italy has a messed up media. There are semi-naked women on nearly every TV show (none of whom are allowed to speak). The Prime Minister of Italy owns most of the media (and guess what – all his TV companies refuse to criticise ANYTHING he does – and Silvio is anything but an angel.

    Why the big deal over some pics for a gay mag?

  5. Simon Murphy 5 Jan 2010, 10:03pm

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_freedom_of_press

    Italy’s press is now ‘partly free’ – it is now less free than the former communist countries of Eastern Europe.

  6. I would be interested if anyone could fill me in on what Italy is like for gay men as I’m going to live in Rome soon. Does anyone have any advice or anything of interest to say? I would appreciate comments from people with experience of Italy.

  7. the.kitty.channel 6 Jan 2010, 10:26am

    Reports in the press (for instance of reactions to gay events in Rome) have been overwhelmingly negative. Maybe the gay scene in Rome is a bit like the UK was in the 1950s. Italian political life is tarnished by Berlusconi, so you’d expect little in the way of tolerance. Rome’s gay pride event in 2009 had no support from any authorities, who viewed it as “immoral” and “useless”.

  8. I think the main issue here is that he posed in his football kit. I would think that anyone posing and representing a football club would need permission to do so. So did someone agree to the images being used in a gay mag…if not and he by passed his employer then that would happen no matter which company/business it is…but if they were approved then he shouldn’t be fined for doing it.

  9. oh and if he did it to make a point and had to by pass his employer, then maybe someone could back him and pay the fine for him to say well done.

  10. Simon Murphy 6 Jan 2010, 11:45am

    Italy is only barely a democracy (if they were to apply to join the EU today they would be rejected because of their lack of a free press and the rampant corruption at all levels of society).

    It’s a pretty place to visit but it’s become more and more of a joke under that crook Berlusconi (I’d probably get arrested for saying that in Italy).

    Berlusconi really has been disastrous for Italy – sort of turning the country into an international joke. Most Italians don’t know this however seeing as Berlusconi controls most of the press and the press he controls is not allowed to criticise him. Instead they’ll be watching women in bikinis posing on the sidelines in prime time political debates.

  11. Well this guy has more balls than any player in the English league, none of whom can even say homophobia is wrong.

  12. James Justice 6 Jan 2010, 12:56pm

    Adrian T

    “Well this guy has more balls than any player in the English league, none of whom can even say homophobia is wrong.”

    Check out what David James (Premiership goalkeeper) has had to say about homophobia in football. He wrote an article for the Guardian and donated the fee to Stonewall.

  13. the.kitty.channel 6 Jan 2010, 2:33pm

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/football/2007/apr/15/sport.comment2 is the reference for David James’ article.

  14. Thanks for the link, v. useful

  15. Robert, ex pat Brit 6 Jan 2010, 6:57pm

    Luke, I’ve spent a lot of time in Italy over the past 25 years. By and large, its very much a homophobic society, odd for a country that never criminalised it. A few municipalities have limited rights for same-sex couples but there is no national recognition of them. Same-sex legal unions probably won’t happen at the national level for decades to come if at all. Though the roman cult was disestablished as the state religion back in 1983, its power and influence still remain. Socially, Italy is one of the most backward countries. Its beautiful yes, its culture unsurpassed having sixty percent of the world’s art within its borders. Just be alert when you walk on the streets at night. Pickpockets are everywhere so be on your guard, especially in the touristy areas such as Piazza Navona, the Coliseum,mostly during the warmer months. All in all, Italians are friendly for the most part and if you speak the language, you’ll be given special attention, though mostly all Italians nowadays know English as well as French.

    Know also that Italians have a very different approach to dining. A cooked breakfast is unheard of, usually coffee, perhaps a brioche or biscotti. Mid-morning, cappuccino is very popular (you’ll never see it drunk after a meal at night as I’ve seen in America). The main meal is usually at lunch time with a lighter collation in the evening. Pasta portions are far smaller than we see in other countries and are rarely if ever a main course. Most restaurants or trattorie do not have second sittings. The table you dine at is yours for the evening. If you buy a bottle of wine during dinner and don’t finish it, it is yours to take home and some establishments sometimes keep the remainder for when you return. The whole dining experience is very different to what we are accustomed to in America and other anglo countries. Pizza is unlike anything you’ve had outside of Italy, you must try it. What passes for pizza in other countries wouldn’t pass muster in Italy since all ingredients must be fresh, nothing processed, a law in fact. I could go on but hope this information will help you adjust to your new life in Rome, arguably one of the most beautiful cities in the world. The antiquity alone is unsurpassed anywhere in Europe. The men are arguably the most handsome too.

  16. corazonbianco 6 Jan 2010, 7:54pm

    His name is Dátolo, not Datalo.

  17. Australian gay activist Paul Mitchell 7 Jan 2010, 7:42am

    @Robert

    In Italy homosexuality was illegal until 1876. But in England and Wales it was illegal until 1967 (with an unequal age of consent until 2000). Scotland and Northern Ireland homosexuality has been legal since 1982.

    France and Andorra homosexuality has been legal since 1791 – yes thats right 1791!!!!!!

    The Netherlands since 1811.

    Denmark, Switzerland and Sweden since 1944.

    Now for relationship recognition:

    Ireland, Liechiestain (a tiny country between Switzerland and Austria) and Estonia will be next for civil partnerships or registered partnerships in Europe this year.

    Portugal, Luxembourg and Iceland will be next in line for gay marriage in Europe this year!!!!

    Solvenia next year.

    I doubt that Albania will allow gay marriage (but it is still a possibility).

    France, Germany, UK, Finland and Denmark will NOT have gay marriage over the next 6 years!!!! – Because of conservative governments in coalition power and their lobbyists!!!!

  18. planesdrifter 7 Jan 2010, 3:12pm

    Where isn’t there homophobia? But I’ve been to Italy a number of times and of all the European countries I’ve visited it is definitely the most closeted and has some of the most macho, homophobes on the continent.

  19. The Grinch 7 Jan 2010, 7:08pm

    The photographer is the one that should get punished – snap is totally out of focus and I can’t see any peen. Lame.

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