Enter your email address to receive our daily LGBT news roundup

You're free to unsubscribe at any time.

Ugandan parliament to debate anti-gay bill today

Post your comment

Comments on this article are now closed.

Reader comments

  1. get in the 21st century! wot next? bringing back eating missionaries????

  2. Har Davids 18 Dec 2009, 2:44pm

    An expression of concern is not enough, the message should be: “Even the suggestion that those measures should be discussed in parliament of all places, means Uganda is no longe part of civilisation and should lose it’s seat at the UN, the Commonwealth and any other kind of international organisation. This country should be shunned by at least the Western world.

  3. Jean-Paul Bentham 18 Dec 2009, 7:30pm

    Har:

    Agreed.

    Also, the influence of George W. Bush, “The Family” and Rick Warren on Ugandan officials should be exposed in no uncertain terms, because that is precisely the “western influence’ Uganda should be fighting against; and so should we.

    As for the debate, either way, it spells disaster.

  4. Letters to Uganda 18 Dec 2009, 7:58pm

    If you would like to send a message of support to LGBT Ugandans, I have started a new website:

    LETTERS TO UGANDA was created to be a means for all decent and fair-minded people of the world to send their letters of support to the LGBT people of Uganda. Many of us cannot affect change within Uganda itself, but we can let gay and lesbian Ugandans know that they are not alone; that there are people in this world who support them, who value them as human beings, and who are speaking out against injustice.

    This is your opportunity to send a message of hope and solidarity to the people of Uganda. Please submit your letter of support today.

    Visit: letterstouganda.wordpress.com

  5. Patrick James 18 Dec 2009, 8:11pm

    Har Davids writes about Uganda:

    should lose it’s seat at the UN, the Commonwealth and any other kind of international organisation. This country should be shunned by at least the Western world.

    Of course this is true and diplomatic exclusion would be the way ahead imho.

    However the problem we have is that Western countries have looked the other while other countries criminalise homosexuality and apply the death penalty in some circumstances such as Saudi Arabia for example.

    In fact we look the other way while all kinds of human rights issues are infringed on a massive scale.

    I think Peter Tatchell has it right that we need to address the issue of civil rights globally. How that is to be implemented I don’t know but it is the way ahead.

    One thing which the Uganda story highlights is that we can no longer consider LGBT rights in isolation. We can no longer simply worry about LGBT issues on a national scale in our own country.

    Uganda knows that it can get away with this because we let many other societies get away with it. Other countries with very homophobic governments will follow I fear.

    As far as Europe is concerned the British Conservative Party has created a tiny European Parliamentary grouping which includes the extreme homophobic Polish Law and Justice Party. Because the European grouping is so small it represents a massive boost to the esteem of the Polish Law and Justice Party in Eastern Europe. It sends out a clear message to other extreme homophobic parties that the British, in Conservative form, will happily advance their cause.

    I notice that David Cameron, who has so much to say about so many things, seems to be very quiet about the new legislation in Uganda. I guess this is because of his Eastern European friends who would love to pass similar legislation in Poland. How is he to criticise monstrous homophobes in Uganda when he advances the cause of similar individuals in Poland?

    Whoever forms the government of the UK after the next election must address the issues of civil rights on a global basis. What is required is a global consensus of acceptable standards for human rights. Unfortunately this is extremely difficult, more difficult even than coming to an agreement at the current conference in Copenhagen. However I feel that we must begin this process no matter how difficult it may seem.

  6. Patrick James 18 Dec 2009, 8:13pm

    Now, I hope, without all text italicised :)

    Har Davids writes about Uganda:

    should lose it’s seat at the UN, the Commonwealth and any other kind of international organisation. This country should be shunned by at least the Western world.

    Of course this is true and diplomatic exclusion would be the way ahead imho.

    However the problem we have is that Western countries have looked the other while other countries criminalise homosexuality and apply the death penalty in some circumstances such as Saudi Arabia for example.

    In fact we look the other way while all kinds of human rights issues are infringed on a massive scale.

    I think Peter Tatchell has it right that we need to address the issue of civil rights globally. How that is to be implemented I don’t know but it is the way ahead.

    One thing which the Uganda story highlights is that we can no longer consider LGBT rights in isolation. We can no longer simply worry about LGBT issues on a national scale in our own country.

    Uganda knows that it can get away with this because we let many other societies get away with it. Other countries with very homophobic governments will follow I fear.

    As far as Europe is concerned the British Conservative Party has created a tiny European Parliamentary grouping which includes the extreme homophobic Polish Law and Justice Party. Because the European grouping is so small it represents a massive boost to the esteem of the Polish Law and Justice Party in Eastern Europe. It sends out a clear message to other extreme homophobic parties that the British, in Conservative form, will happily advance their cause.

    I notice that David Cameron, who has so much to say about so many things, seems to be very quiet about the new legislation in Uganda. I guess this is because of his Eastern European friends who would love to pass similar legislation in Poland. How is he to criticise monstrous homophobes in Uganda when he advances the cause of similar individuals in Poland?

    Whoever forms the government of the UK after the next election must address the issues of civil rights on a global basis. What is required is a global consensus of acceptable standards for human rights. Unfortunately this is extremely difficult, more difficult even than coming to an agreement at the current conference in Copenhagen. However I feel that we must begin this process no matter how difficult it may seem.

  7. Jean-Paul Bentham 18 Dec 2009, 8:20pm

    Here’s an “item” I just received from ILGHRC:

    Minneapolis City Council Passes Resolution Opposing Anti-Homosexuality Bill in Uganda

    For Immediate Release:

    December 18, 2009

    Contacts:

    IGLHRC: Hossein Alizadeh, 212-430-6016, halizadeh@iglhrc.org
    The Task Force: Pedro Julio Serrano, 646.358.1479, pserrano@thetaskforce.org
    Minneapolis City Council: Cam Gordon, (612) 673-2202, Cam.Gordon@ci.minneapolis.mn.us

    (New York, December 18) – The city of Minneapolis, Minn., a sister city of Kampala, Uganda, passed a resolution on Friday, Dec. 18 condemning Uganda’s proposed Anti-Homosexuality Bill. Councilmembers Scott Benson and Cam Gordon co-authored the resolution in light of the negative impact the law would have on all citizens of Kampala, pointing out that the bill “targets lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Ugandans, their advocates and defenders and anyone who fails to report them to the authorities.”

    The resolution amended the Policy Initiatives section of the Fiscal Year 2010 Federal Agenda for the City of Minneapolis to insert a section entitled “Human Rights Restrictions in Uganda.” Noting that the Anti-Homosexuality Bill “[w]ould criminalize such activities as funding LGBT organizations, publishing or broadcasting or marketing materials on homosexuality,” the Resolution affirms that, “[t]he City of Minneapolis opposes this legislation.”

    On October 14, 2009, the Anti-Homosexuality Bill was introduced in Uganda’s Parliament. In its current form, the proposed bill would:

    * Imprison anyone convicted of “the offense of homosexuality” for life;

    * Punish “aggravated homosexuality”-including repeat offenders, or anyone who is HIV positive and engages in same-sex activity-with the death penalty;

    * Forbid the “promotion of homosexuality,” and jail defenders of LGBT rights

    * Require reporting anyone known to be lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender within 24 hours or face up to three years in prison.

    The resolution passed by the City Council of Minneapolis demonstrates the still growing international opposition to the Anti-Homosexuality Bill and solidarity with LGBT people worldwide.

    Other sister cities of Kampala include Kigali, Rwanda; Rajkot, India; Ashkelon, Israel; and Hudson, USA.

    Text of Resolution:

    (Download PDF)

    Resolution

    of the

    City of Minneapolis

    By Benson, Gordon, Glidden, Hofstede, Remington, Hodges, Colvin Roy, Ostrow

    Amending the Policy Initiatives section of the Fiscal Year 2010 Federal Agenda for the City of Minneapolis by inserting a section entitled “Human Rights Restrictions in Uganda.”

    Whereas, the Uganda Legislature is considering a law that would strengthen penalties against the promotion of homosexuality, and

    Whereas, Bill Number 18, the Anti-Homosexuality Bill of 2009 targets lesbian, gay and transgender Ugandans, their advocates and defenders and anyone who fails to report them to the authorities; and

    Whereas, the legislation would criminalize such activities as funding LGBT organizations, publishing or broadcasting or marketing materials on homosexuality; and

    Whereas, a person guilty of promoting homosexuality could be subject to a fine or imprisonment;

    Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved by The City Council of The City of Minneapolis:

    That the Policy Initiatives section of the Fiscal Year 2010 Federal Agenda for the City of Minneapolis be further amended by inserting a section entitled “Human Rights Restrictions in Uganda” stating as follows:

    The Uganda Legislature is considering a law that would strengthen penalties against the promotion of homosexuality. Bill Number 18, the Anti-Homosexuality Bill of 2009 targets lesbian, gay and transgender Ugandans, their advocates and defenders and anyone who fails to report them to the authorities. The legislation would criminalize such activities as funding LGBT organizations, publishing or broadcasting or marketing materials on homosexuality. A person guilty of promoting homosexuality could be subject to a fine or imprisonment. The City of Minneapolis opposes this legislation.

    ###

    Contacts:

    International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission (IGLHRC) in New York:
    Hossein Alizadeh
    +1-212-430-6016
    halizadeh@iglhrc.org

    National Gay and Lesbian Task Force:
    Pedro Julio Serrano
    +1 646-358-1479
    pserrano@theTaskForce.org

    Minneapolis City Council
    Cam Gordon, Minneapolis City Council Member, Second Ward
    +1 612-673-2202 (office), 612-296-0579 (cell)
    Cam.Gordon@ci.minneapolis.mn.us

    The International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission (IGLHRC) is a leading international organization dedicated to advancing human rights for everyone, everywhere to end discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression. http://www.iglhrc.org

    The Institute for Welcoming Resources, a program of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, is located in Minneapolis, Minn., and has joined with many people of faith across the world to condemn this immoral bill. The mission of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force is to build the political power of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community from the ground up. We do this by training activists, organizing broad-based campaigns to defeat anti-LGBT referenda and advance pro-LGBT legislation, and by building the organizational capacity of our movement. http://www.theTaskForce.org

    IGLHRC | 80 Maiden Lane, Suite 1505 | New York, NY 10038 | phone: 212.430.6054 | fax: 212.430.6060 |

  8. Jean-Paul Bentham 18 Dec 2009, 10:05pm

    Patrick James (6):

    Yes, we need to develop a global approach, but we don’t have to re-invent the wheel. IGLHRC already exists, so does Global Gayz.

    Also, developed western countries do turn a blind eye to abuse in other countries. A horrendous example of that is the USA’s failure to intervene in Puerto Rico’s revolution in June which has triggered a wave of ruthless murders of members of the LGBT community.

    I know that we all have our lives to live and our bills to pay, but sometimes I wonder if we too are not turning a blind eye to homophobia around the world.

  9. Jean-Paul Bentham 19 Dec 2009, 7:42am

    Er…that should read “…Honduras’ revolution in June”, but Peurto Rico’s gay community is also being persecuted heavily these days.

  10. Bishop Ioan 19 Dec 2009, 10:12am

    I would hope that common sense would prevail, but I suspect it won’t. I suspect that unless Western countries grow a spine and impliment diplomatic penalties and withdrawl all aid to Uganda, this mess will get passed. Even if they do grow a spine this may well be passed. Uganda has stricken itself from the roster of civilised country by even considering this bill.

  11. Does this really mean that having consensual heterosexual sex while HIV-positive escapes punishment but that having consensual gay sex while HIV-positive risks the death penalty? Does it mean that an HIV-positive person is treated more leniently if he rapes a woman than he would be if he had consensual sex with another man? Does this mean that a disabled person who is gay would be totally denied sex in any circumstances?

    What a sad lot of bigots.
    What is there from Uganda to boycott?

  12. It is time for Great Britian, Canada, Australia and New Zealand to withdraw fron the Commonwealth and leave the dictators, murderers, thieves and all of those corrupt people who run Africa to their own insidious downfalls. Not a cent should be paid in aid until all the scoundrels are consumed by their own peoples. Uganda, Zimbabwe and so many others are an abomination!

  13. Sentamu, the archbishop of York, is from Uganda.
    Yet not a word out of him!

    They’re a gutless bunch.

    I’m so pleased I got out of their
    kind of institutionalised claptrap
    and principleless self-serving
    that has hijacked a wonderful philosophy.

    Celebrate the birth of a wonderful person
    but forget the churches,
    they are not Christianity.

    In today’s Daily Wail, Sentamu is going on about
    the apparent joy of everything traditionally English,
    almost his last words are:

    “The trick is not to be cynical……..”

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-1237211/ARCHBISHOP-JOHN-SENTAMU-Corus-Cockermouth-proud-Made-Britain.html

    Really, Sentamu, really??????????

  14. Jane: “What a sad lot of bigots. What is there from Uganda to boycott?”

    Plenty – They receive massive financial aid from the EU and others, and UK for one allows many Ugandans to live and work in UK.
    We just cut the funds and return and/or repatriate any Ugandans in the UK. They need us WAY more than we need them.

  15. Thanks alot – your answer solved all my probmles after several days struggling

These comments are un-moderated and do not necessarily represent the views of PinkNews.co.uk. If you believe that a comment is inappropriate or libellous, please contact us.

Top commenters this week

Latest stories

See all