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Trans businesswoman Kate Craig-Wood vies for Entrepreneur of the Year

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  1. Kate Craig-Wood is not only a successful business woman she does a lot to support trans kids as well. I wish her all the best in the national awards :)

  2. Having just looked at her website, it’s clear that she’s an articulate and intelligent champion for trans people. Good for her. I hope she’s amply rewarded for her integrity.

  3. Kate’s company is Memset, not Memsnet.

    Congratulations, Kate and good luck!

  4. Jen Marcus 26 Nov 2009, 1:40pm

    Congratulations, Kate, you are an excellent business professional and role model for LGBT people and women everywhere, and I might add, a very attractive one at that! :)

  5. Brian Burton 26 Nov 2009, 1:42pm

    You Know, the more I see and hear about these wonderful and some very tallented Trans people, the more I love and respect them. OK..theotherone?

  6. Good, Brian, just as we already (unconditionally) love and respect you.

    jane.

  7. Brian, for you and everyone reading this story, just have a look at these women, just a few of the many successful trans women and trans men:

    http://ai.eecs.umich.edu/people/conway/TSsuccesses/TSgallery1.html

    jane.

  8. Super, go girl… I don’t know why people make a big deal out her being trans… I am not sure where the connection between trans and not being successful and abnormal come from. Most trans people aim just to live their lives and do as well as anyone else, transitioning is just a bump in the road. There are probably tons of successful “trans” people out there, it is just that they don’t advertise they are trans.

  9. sorry to avoid sounding shallow.. but… she is sooooooo pretty!!!

  10. I respect her for her openess and also that she acknowledges that being “attractive” has made it easier. I think it is more empowering that she recognises that about her own story, and the “advantage” that gave her in transition and how she can use that to support other Trans folk. When you’re part of a discriminated against group, it is surprising how much courage it takes to say “I’m lucky, people have it harder than me”.

  11. A GREAT STORY

  12. Brian Burton 27 Nov 2009, 9:54am

    Jane thankyou…mind blowing!

  13. Jasper:

    | I respect her for her openess and also that she acknowledges
    | that being “attractive” has made it easier. I think it is more
    | empowering that she recognises that about her own story, and the
    | “advantage” that gave her in transition and how she can use that
    | to support other Trans folk. When you’re part of a discriminated
    | against group, it is surprising how much courage it takes to say
    | “I’m lucky, people have it harder than me”.

    I’m sure she recognises that it is more empowering to say she is attractive that to say she owes that to the money she spent on facial feminisation surgery, or that her success in business and the expensive hobbies it funds are owed to family money, and opportunities in her family’s businesses.

    But what matters is the use she makes of the eminence, and there she is a huge disappointment. Yes she tells youngsters to transition early (specifically in the hope that they will not need the facial surgery she benefited from, and which is almost impossible to get on the NHS), but not (apparently, since she did not transition until after achieving a doctorate, marrying, and becoming a company director) having been a transsexual child, facing the terrible pain and prejudice we face, she is largely giving advice, and seeking to influence, out of ignorance. An ignorance that leads her to back the trans-issues careerist (who is only the father of a woman with a history of transsexuality) who is GIRES, who always describes transsexual children to the press and public bodies as “confused”, which is very harmful and the opposite of the truth. Just as she backs other wrong causes, such as advocating against progesterone being a part of our hormone regimens (of which it should be considered essential), and backing a doctor who lies about that. And it isn’t helpful for a woman who has thrown money at every obstacle to tell transsexual people that anything other than the top-whack Thai reassignment surgery she bought is any good. To those for whom the NHS is their only hope that’s just suicide promotion.

    And I cannot let pass her “I could have gone stealth, my surgery was good enough that people wouldn’t have known, but I decided it was more important than my own bit of comfort to use my experience to help other people.” Again she is talking out of ignorance. She didn’t go stealth because she doesn’t have the need, and she clearly loves the attention. Those of us who do live, in real life, with as few people as possible knowing our terrible past (sometimes described as “stealth” for the dire want of a better term), which few could understand and would just be a barrier to them understanding who we really are, do so because that is our need, not for “comfort”. Almost all transsexual children who survive go on to live this way, and most post-reassignment surgery women do, if they can. And it doesn’t necessarily prevent helping others.

    We identify as women, we needed (so terrible a need that we do everything necessary, including surgery and huge sacrifices) to be women, and anyone known to have a past history of transsexuality is instead forever thought never quite a woman, or worse. That’s how the human brain is wired and it will never change (unless it is a close individual it identifies same sex, opposite sex, and not human), and it affects so much. Most of us have experienced the difference, and it is terrifying.

    For those who identified with transgender, or love attention it is different. A different need, and a different experience. And the gap is so wide that really those who don’t have the experience really should avoid temptation to spread “wisdom” about other’s needs.

    And, oh yes, I too will say “I’m lucky. Others have it harder than me”. It’s true, if anyone born transsexual can be considered lucky at all.

  14. Brian Burton:
    | Jane thankyou…mind blowing!

    Yes, and that’s just the ones the site owner knows, considers successful, and has received permission from (usually). Yet still most people apparently think “transsexual” is synonymous with “sex worker”. Only last month all the “quality papers” were saying that an Italian scandal was due to a man being photographed with “a transsexual”. You’ll notice that UK politicians take great care only to be photographed with transsexual men, and they still look very uncomfortable with it.

  15. Kate was runner up.

    Well done

  16. Oatc is a perfect example of the bitter, angry sub-group of the so-called trans community. People like that will never be happy for other people’s acheivements and are not worth listening to.

    Kate seems like a wonderful woman and has done well to get where she is now in transition and business. I’m stealth and could never do what she did.

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