A lesbian couple in France have won their 11-year battle to adopt a child.

One of the women has been referred to as Emmanuelle B, while the other has not been named.

Emmanuelle B is a nursery school teacher. The couple have been living together since 1990.

According to Reuters, an administrative tribunal in the eastern town of Besancon granted the couple the right after they had been turned down by regional authorities.

French law allows gays and lesbians to adopt individually, but not as a couple. Emmanuelle B and her partner could have adopted a child if only one of them applied, but they chose to fight for the right to adopt jointly.

Emmanuelle B and her partner were first rejecting from adopting a child together in 1998.

The European Court of Human Rights found in her favour last year but she was again barred from jointly adopting when French authorities said she and partner had disagreed over what age child they would prefer to adopt.

The administrative tribunal made its decision to allow them to adopt together today (Tuesday).

In England and Wales, gay, lesbian and bisexual individuals and couples are legally entitled to be considered as adoptive parents under the Sexual Orientation Regulations which came into force in 2007.

This right was granted in Scotland in September, under the Adoption & Children (Scotland) Act 2007.