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Police appeal after men suffer homophobic abuse

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  1. dave whack 25 Sep 2009, 7:54pm

    The article is not very clear as why these 2 guys were picked on. it seems outrageous that guys get abused in this way.

  2. What a transformation! I remember the days when calling the police meant they would at best ignore you, and at worst, join in with the abusing…

  3. Yeah. Outrageous. I mean, look at that poor man in the picture, he is a complete wreck after three boys rode past and called him a “poof”. The mental scarring may never go away.

    Ok, jokes aside, so it’s not acceptable behaviour, but it’s hardly on a par with serial murder. I can understand where there may have been physical assault involved, but the massive emphasis they appear to be putting on this case is totally unjustified and disproportionate to the crime.

    I know I will get stick for this, but it seems that those that shout loudest seem to get the most attention, and whilst a barrage of coppers seek to find the perpetrators of this most heinous felony, others are just being left.

  4. RobN, again you have demonstrated lack of compassion and a failure to empathise with the feelings of others.

  5. Eddy: …Which exactly the response I was expecting to get back in droves by people that are so damn selfish they see being gay as the pinnacle of everything that is important in this world.

    As I said, I by no means condone the act, and it should be investigated, but in comparison to many other crimes being committed, it is trivial, bordering on the inconsequential, and certainly not worthy of even a page on this room. If every person that was personally insulted by some name calling had this degree of attention, nothing would ever get done.

    It’s not the crime I am commenting on, it’s the matter of priorities.

  6. And your morality, your extraordinary “logic”, and your priorities, Rob, need serious attention.

    It is not “damn selfish” nor is it seeing “being gay as the pinnacle of everything that is important in this world” to FEEL for the humiliation and embarrassment caused to any gay or lesbian person who has been scorned and mocked openly and loudly in the street.

    It’s about time you got your act together, mate!

  7. Eddy: I would rather feel concern for the old people beaten up, the abused children, people burgled, mugged, sexually assaulted, drink drivers, people walking around with guns and knives. etc etc. I think my act is where it should be, concerned with people less fortunate than the usual ‘me,me,me’ attitude of the general gay population.

  8. It’s not either/or, black or white. Of course one should be concerned about “old people beaten up, the abused children, people burgled, mugged, sexually assaulted, drink drivers, people walking around with guns and knives” but one must be equally concerned about the humiliation meted out to gay and lesbian people by homophobes.

  9. BrazilGayScene 27 Sep 2009, 3:17am

    I can see RobN’s point, (for a change), Unfortunately, it IS a case of ‘either/or’. Police resources are not limitless… when you report a burglary and wait and wait for someone coming out to you, clearly the resources are not limitless. However, as balance, I see the officer dealing with this is ‘PC Noel Griffiths’, PC, (Police Constable)… It is hardly a waste of Police resources to have this one PC (who it was reported to) dealing with it? This is quite proper and correct. Now, if it had been ‘Inspector Griffiths’ dealing with it, then I feel that would have been overkill.

  10. No one else is comparing this homophobic crime to other forms of crime, only RobN, who I suspect would ignore and dismiss it if he was working on the case, an approach which could expose the police to prosecution. Once the police starts to dismiss cases on the basis of priorities, we’re all doomed.

  11. The N word still lurks in the shadows. I guess very few would take an inconsequent approach and tell black people that their abusers should be taken lightly because of “higher” priorities.

  12. right lets go down the road up the pub shouting racist abuse as we go. as long as we don’t kill anyone, it’s ok >:)

  13. Bob: Too late, it’s already happening. The Police have told people in my area that burglary “is not their problem” and it should be the council’s responsibility.

  14. Police appeal after men suffer homophobic abuse « LGBTN 27 Sep 2009, 10:14pm

    […] Full Story […]

  15. Police appeal after men suffer homophobic abuse « LGBTN 27 Sep 2009, 10:57pm

    […] Full Story Tagged as: abuse, Hampshire, incident, Police, Reading Road, september 23rd, two men, Yately Leave a comment Comments (0) Trackbacks (0) ( subscribe to comments on this post ) […]

  16. “I think my act is where it should be, concerned with people less fortunate than the usual ‘me,me,me’ attitude of the general gay population.”

    Oh, poor , poor RobN, persecuting the gay community again because they are all “selfish and self-serving”. It also why he has not sex any more with us despicable queers. I suppose its okay to shout the word “nigger” at black people too. RobN, you are hardly any yardstick on what is acceptable or not acceptable, you’re a racist, and someone with more self loathing than a suicidal lemming.

  17. Andy: Thanks for the support there mate. All you do is reinforce what I said. Selfish and self-serving. How typical of you to attack me for not having sex with the likes of you, but frankly, I am not that desperate and would never lower myself to such a level; and if being patriotic to one’s country means telling immigrants they can’t come in, so be it, but don’t hurl unsubstantiated claims that I am racist, that’s just the usual lefty cowards way out.

    oh, and lemmings are not suicidal, it’s a myth.
    But then I’m sure you would believe Disney before anyone with a bit of grey matter.

  18. “oh, and lemmings are not suicidal, it’s a myth.”

    Its called sarcasm. Not the brightest, are we? All anger, no substance. Love your refe4rence to “patriotic”, when we’ve all seen what that means in your previous posts. Rather the same way Nick Griffin was “patriotic”. I can see why no one wants to f*** your brains out, it would all be over in under 2 seconds. We’ll all chip in and buy you a shoe to gnaw, there’s a good boy.

  19. Bill Channon 29 Sep 2009, 12:38am

    Why isn’t Rob allowed to express his views without people like Andy insulting him. Sarcasm??? Nope! What you say is cruel. Andy, I don’t know what you’d call it but to be silly his comments are certainly ‘freespeechophobic! I agree that the case in the article was abusive. I’m quite overweight but Andy I would hope that you wouldn’t call me ‘fatty’. That would be equally abusive. I do agree with Rob that their are far, far more serious crimes that are all too often not dealt with by police because they make decisions to focus on lesser issues -and that is absolutely not to denigrate the events in the article.

  20. Jean-Paul Bentham 29 Sep 2009, 7:44am

    Personally I thought Eddy had the right attitude and I can understand Andy’s mounting indignation because they were being bear-baited, just for fun. It’s like poking a caged animal relentlessly just to see how agitated it will become.

    It’s not so much the content as the intent that annoys.

    What exactly were the kids’ on, and what were their intentions??

    Even a word like “opera” can take on a wide range of meanings depending on the tone of the human voice which in turn betrays one’s intention. As much as 90% of communication is done with the tone of voice.

    For example, if the gay men who were attacked had given in to the anger which the youngsters were intenting to provoke, the kids would have reproached the gay guys their tone of voice because it would have expressed anger.

    Childish behavior really, to provoke others to anger.

    Lesbians and Transsexuals are commonly assaulted also for no other reason that they are who they are. Mindless violence, and I certainly don’t mean to imply that I am better than anybody else.

    What surprises me the most though is that there must have been witnesses, and the fact that they do not come forward when they are implored to assist the justice system speaks volumes, doesn’t it, and in this case it speaks volumes about the mentality of a place called Yately, in Manchester.

    Now that I think of it, there is something operatic about this story, and I think we are looking at another example of the rising tide of homophobia in the world.

  21. Bob Channon asks, Comment #19, “Why isn’t Rob allowed to express his views without people like Andy insulting him?”

    Bob Channon, are you a UK resident? If so, you ought to be very much aware of the massive uproar there is at the moment in the public, political, police and social-work arenas regarding the fact that Fiona Pilkington, 38, killed herself and her daughter Francesca Hardwick in a burning car after years of verbal abuse on their estate – largely name-calling due to the fact that the daughter, Francesca, had serious learning difficulties.

    Almost every heart in this entire country is at the moment acknowledging and lamenting the fact that the bullying and name-calling that these two women had to endure caused them to drive to a lay-by out of town, to pour petrol over the back seat, and to thus burn themselves to death. It was an act of desperation after repeated calls to the police had failed to have the bullies, young unprincipled immoral louts, stopped.

    So, Bob Channon, the reason why Rob’s views must be contested, as Andy contested them, is that Rob’s view is that such louts ought not to be reprimanded by the police. That view is repugnant and despicable. Andy disagrees with it, I disagree with it, Jean-Paul Bentham disagrees with it, and almost this entire nation is at the moment disagreeing with it.

    Click here for latest update: No excuses for failings which led to the deaths of a mother and daughter who were hounded by youths, Home Secretary Alan Johnson has said.

  22. Jean-Paul Bentham 29 Sep 2009, 8:07pm

    Eddy:

    Thanks for the link. Otherwise, I would have missed this entire story, how it does relate to the issue of homphobic abuse as well, and how it is instrumental in putting all the points of view expressed by everyone on this thread into perspective.

    Again, this BBC story reads like a scene from a classical opera with Francecca Hardwick, Fiona Pilkington and of course the Simmons family playing against a backdrop of a place called Leicester, in contemporary England.

    The only character missing to turn this opera into an Aeschylean tragedy is some poor, misguided and inebriated alcoholic throwing more gasoline onto the burning car claiming to be protecting the priorities of the nation, the most important one being the production and sale of more alcohol.

    But I ain’t bitter.

    To quote from the link:

    “There were “no excuses” for failings which contributed to the deaths of a mother and daughter who were hounded by youths, the home secretary has said.”

    A most patriotic statement made through the lens of a most sober, drug-free and educated Englishman, I dare say.

  23. As usual, people always have to retort with an extreme. If I’ve got a headache, you’ve got a migraine, If I’ve got a migraine, you’ve got a f_cking brain tumour.

    The Pilkington case bears no relation whatsoever to this one. Those women were persistently hounded over a number of years, including things thrown at them and the house.

    The gay incident was a single, one-off occurrence, a few boys ride by on bikes and have a pop and obviously one of these guys is some stuck-up busybody that has nothing better to do than waste police time by marching down to the station and reporting the whole thing.

    These two cases are light-years apart. Had the situation been more than one occasion, or any physical abuse, then I would report it, but some kids having a bit of banter is just something you put down to experience, for crying out loud, get over it.

  24. Jean-Paul Bentham 30 Sep 2009, 12:33pm

    Personally I thought Eddy had the right attitude and I can understand Andy’s mounting indignation because they were being bear-baited, just for fun. It’s like poking a caged animal relentlessly just to see how agitated it will become.

    It’s not so much the content as the intent that annoys.

    What exactly were the kids’ on, and what were their intentions??

    Even a word like “opera” can take on a wide range of meanings depending on the tone of the human voice which in turn betrays one’s intention. As much as 90% of communication is done with the tone of voice.

    For example, if the gay men who were attacked had given in to the anger which the youngsters were intenting to provoke, the kids would have reproached the gay guys their tone of voice because it would have expressed anger.

    Childish behavior really, to provoke others to anger.

    Lesbians and Transsexuals are commonly assaulted also for no other reason that they are who they are. Mindless violence, and I certainly don’t mean to imply that I am better than anybody else.

    What surprises me the most though is that there must have been witnesses, and the fact that they do not come forward when they are implored to assist the justice system speaks volumes, doesn’t it, and in this case it speaks volumes about the mentality of a place called Yately, in Manchester.

    Now that I think of it, there is something operatic about this story, and I think we are looking at another example of the rising tide of homophobia in England.

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