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Comment: Is it time for a more realistic L Word?

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  1. i somewhat liked the l word even while i hated its lack of legitimatly butch characters and the sometimes shameful way it deal t with trans issues.

    I hope the bbc3 show is better

  2. While we are at it, can we also get rid of “Queer” and “Homophobia”?

    I find “queer” as offensive as black people find “nigger”, no matter how some people attempt to reclaim it for themselves.

    Come to think of it, all this gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, curious, slightly interested, asexual, trisexual, full-cream, low-fat labeling bollocks should be put into one word that encompasses all non-heterosexuals, and another word for those people that disapprove of them. It’s not a phobia, they aren’t afraid, they just don’t like us, so bloody well say so.

    1. I call “homophobia” by what it should really be called: “homohatred”.

  3. RobN,

    slight problem as queer can emcompess straight people and non-hetrosexual cant. for instance straight but trans.

  4. Well I was overjoyed to watch hot, femme lesbians on screen (even if they were acting). I hang out mostly with gay men but the lesbians I do know are femme with good jobs so why shouldn’t we see that on TV? I hope the UK doesn’t go completely opposite & try to show ‘real’ lesbians because it will probably descend into stereotypes leaving me & the wife unable to relate.

  5. Catherine Vaille 3 Sep 2009, 3:15pm

    THE PILOT OF ‘FAR OUT’ THE UK’S FIRST ONLINE LESBIAN TV SERIES LAUNCHES OF THE 6TH OF SEPTEMBER AT http://WWW.FAROUTTV.CO.UK.

    THIS GROUNDBREAKING SHOW IS A WITTY, GRITTY, TITTY TALE OF THE LIVES & LOVES OF A GROUP OF GAY WOMEN WITH A STRIKING SOHO BACKDROP.

    DYNAMIC & UNCENSORED BY BROADCASTERS, FAR OUT IS SET TO MAKE SOME SERIOUS WAVES WITH COMPARRISONS TO QUEER AS FOLK AND THE L WORD ALREADY BEING DRAWN.

  6. Personally, I think the L Word was a great show. British and American TV always take different directions but who’s to say one is better than the other? They are different concepts of what entertainment should be… Personally I find value in both.

    Sure the story lines in the L Word were a bit over the top sometimes. I suppose there must be people out there whose books don’t turn into best-sellers, who don’t run galleries or produce Hollywood movies, etc… But I don’t think that’s the main point of the series. That’s just a bit of glamour to make it flow.

    I think it’s shown us “non-lesbians” out there a different type of world that you don’t get to see often. I’m sure I’m not surprising anyone by pointing out that we not only live in a heterocentric world, but also a male-centred one. Gay men and straight couples alike might not always consciously realise this (just like it’s hard for white people to fully understand or recognise racist bias) but I found it fascinating to watch this world entirely revolving around women, where men are not only absent but completely unnecessary.

    It also had very interesting storylines involving our perception of gender. Max’s choice not to go through with his operation after his talk with… what’s her name, “baby-girl”, his relationship with a gay man. As a gay man myself I found that very interesting because I did kinda fancy him.

    And finally: what’s so evil about escapism?

  7. I know they were costume dramas, so not about contemporary lesbian life, but don’t Tipping the Velvet and Fingersmith count? …

  8. theotherone 8 Sep 2009, 7:34pm

    I hated the L word.

    There was no cropped hair, no Dr. Martins, no men’s wallets…

    Not Dykeland as I know it.

    (the above post is only slightly mocking.)

  9. My friends are for the most part femme and good looking,,yes,,all of them. We hold executive jobs or better than average jobs… yes,,all of us. Other than the L Word we dont feel that represented. when we read post-pride news articles it’s always a crop-haired tatooed bulldyke with one arm raised and a nasty thatch of pit hair blowing in the wind. It was nice to have the L Word represent us that look like and act like the femme womyn we are. And plz, no offence to bulldykes,,,we just want our pic in the paper on occasion too,,and no, not Lindsay Lohan thanks,,,that isn’t what I’m talking about. The str8 world must think we’re all cropped, tatooed and blowing in the wind. Cheers sisters!

  10. theotherone 12 Sep 2009, 11:14pm

    we should have more Femmes sure but can’t we have both in one place?

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