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Jamaican lesbian appeals deportation as Home Office says sexuality ‘is a ruse’

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  1. Bottom line is, she broke the law, OUR law. We don’t want you in our country peddling your filth. If your countrymates are none so friendly, maybe you should have thought about that before coming into the UK with a kilo of smack shoved up your orifice.

    You spout “human rights”? You’re just lucky you didn’t try that in somewhere like Malaysia, or you would be swinging from the end of a rope by now.

  2. How do you know she was a drug dealer RobN? Many innocent and vulnerable women are duped or forced into being drugs mules by arrogant men just like you RobN.

    If you live in a repressive society in regards to sexuality like Jamaica people conform to just survive. This woman would not of been able to explore her sexuality until she was in a environment it was possible. But using the logic of the immigration service all the gay men who have had a heterosexual relationship are not gay!!!!!

    Did you ever have a girlfriend at school RobN? you must not be gay then.

    arrogant t@*t

  3. Abi1975: Why do you socialist wankers like you always assume that there must be some ulterior motive? Never heard of Occam’s razor?
    How about she did it for a f–king great wad of cash?

    Whether she is a lesbian or not is irrelevant. She consciously came into the UK carrying drugs, fully aware of what she was doing, and the repercussions should she be caught. The fact she now pipes up with some reason or other to stay here is unimportant. She flagrantly broke our laws, and now wants us to look after her.

    If that isn’t taking the piss, I don’t know what is.

  4. pietro pennasilico 16 Jul 2009, 11:30pm

    @ RobN
    i ve never left a message before, but i am getting more and more tired of your stupid and intollerant comments. can u please disappear (forever)?
    thanks you

  5. Mihangel apYrs 17 Jul 2009, 7:23am

    Abri1975

    according to the logic of the immigration service, a gay man can be deported to a homophobic country, but that’s OK as long as he’s “discrete”.

    I think we need to know more about this case before jumping up and down, but an amazing number of women become “dis-empowered” and “dupes” once they get caught.

  6. OMG I’m about to agree with RobN. If you want to live in the UK fine but don’t commit crime or you’ll be deported. I agree some women are forced/duped whatever so I would would want more info before I fully commit to an opinion.

  7. Stuart Neyton 17 Jul 2009, 11:36am

    Who is Carine Patry Hoskins to speculate about this woman’s sexual orientation?

    I don’t care what this woman has done to get herself locked up, if she will face persecution when forced back to Jamaica then she shouldn’t be deported. I agree with Abi1975 on the Home Office’s logic. It’s nothing short of offensive.

    It also seems inhumane to split her up from the person she’s fallen in love with. People smuggle drugs or commit crime in general for different reasons. Don’t tar them all with the same brush.

  8. Stuart Neyton: That’s my entire point, you see this whole sexuality/asylum thing prioritising over the fact that she committed a serious crime. If she was so desperate to get out of Jamaica, why did she resort to smuggling drugs? Why did she not apply for a visa like most ordinary people? The fact she got caught, and only then decides to make a request is wrong. We have enough trouble with immigration without allowing drug smugglers to ponce off our state, just because “she’s got a girlfriend”.

    Well shit happens, and in this case, it’s all of her own making.

  9. It never ceases to amaze me how arrogant and judgemental British people can be. We know little about this woman’s life, her reasons for committing her crime or the circumstances surrounding her entry to the UK.

    RobN, you have got it completely back to front. Whether she committed a crime or not is irrelevant. Her sexual orientation is of utmost relevance, since the Home Office’s logic doesn’t just apply to her, it applies across the board to anyone who applies to reside in the UK, whether they have committed a crime or not. You’ve had relationships with people of the opposite sex in the past? Oh well then, you’re not gay, off you go back to a country where you’ll be persecuted, a victim of violence and potentially killed. Their decision has nothing to do with whether or not she has committed a crime, it is whether she’s a “real” lesbian – and what the benchmark for that is.

    Regardless of what this woman has or hasn’t done, anyone on this website who moron with the logic of this decision should be thankful that by an accident of birth they are fortunate and privileged enough to reside in a country where this sort of thing is extremely unlikely to ever happen to them.

  10. It never ceases to amaze me how ignorant and arrogant some British people can be.

    We know little about this woman’s history, the circumstances in her life or her reasons for committing this crime.

    RobN, you’ve got it completely back to front. Whether or not she has committed a crime is irrelevant. Her sexual orientation is of utmost relevance, because this decision & logic doesn’t just apply to her, it applies across the board, to anyone who wishes to reside in this country for fear of persecution. The decision isn’t about whether she has committed a crime; that much has been established and she has served her sentence. It is about whether she’s a “real” lesbian. Ever had a relationship with anyone of the opposite sex? Oh well, you’re not really gay then, off you go on your merry way back to a country where you will be persecuted and a likely victim of violence.

    Anyone idiot on this website who agrees with the Home Office’s logic should be thanking their lucky stars that by an accident of birth they are fortunate and privileged enough to live in a country where they are free to express their sexuality and be protected from persecution by the law.

    As for this:

    “You spout “human rights”? You’re just lucky you didn’t try that in somewhere like Malaysia, or you would be swinging from the end of a rope by now.”

    By that token, you’re just lucky you didn’t try being gay in somewhere like Malaysia, or you would be swinging from the end of a rope by now….

  11. Sam: The fact she is a “real” lesbian, or it’s just a made-up story is not the point. She came to my country, abused the system, broke the law, and then expects us to take her in, poor diddums thing.

    Like I said, is she seriously for real? All this crap about “human rights” – she forgoes her rights the moment she set foot on British soil loaded with narcotics. She is probably more worried that the guy that gave her the drugs in the first place wants his money back. If you live by the sword, then you should die by the sword.

  12. pietro pennasilico 17 Jul 2009, 10:29pm

    if u were heterosexual man u would be a discusting homophobic thug!! shame on u!!!

  13. pietro pennasilico 17 Jul 2009, 10:31pm

    @RobN
    if you were heteroexual u d be a disgusting homophobic thug!! shame on u!!

  14. pietro pennasilico 17 Jul 2009, 10:32pm

    @RobN
    If u were heterosexual u d be a disgusting homophobic thug!!! shame on u!!

  15. Like others, I agree with RobN

  16. @Pietro pennasilico
    “If you were heteroexual u d be a disgusting homophobic thug!! shame on u!!”

    In what way is RobN a thug . . . etc etc etc for pointing out the grey areas in this case

  17. Pietro: The matter of this case, as I keep reiterating has NOTHING to do with homosexuality, and EVERYTHING to do with breaking the law.

    What you are suggesting is because she is (supposedly) a lesbian, we should bypass all our laws to accommodate her. So what if she was disabled? or pregnant? etc. Where do you draw the line? It’s the thin end of the wedge as usual, and I am sick to the back teeth of foreigners taking us for a soft touch. Either follow the rules, or fuck off.

  18. Stuart Neyton 19 Jul 2009, 12:53pm

    “has NOTHING to do with homosexuality, and EVERYTHING to do with breaking the law”

    Then the law needs to be changed. Our asylum system is racist. Why are you forcing her back to somewhere she doesn’t want to go?

  19. Stuart Neyton: “Why are you forcing her back to somewhere she doesn’t want to go?”

    How clear would you like it? Because SHE’S A FUCKING CRIMINAL. THAT’S WHY!

  20. I have to agree with RobN on this.

    Stuart Neyton it is interesting what you have to say:
    Our law needs to be changed?
    Our asylum system is racist?
    You are forcing her back to somewhere she does not want to go?

    Stuart she is a drug criminal . . . we do not want her in our country

    Why do you want to fight for and protect a drug pusher?

  21. Pumpkin Pie 20 Jul 2009, 2:03pm

    She came to my country, abused the system, broke the law, and then expects us to take her in, poor diddums thing.

    Like I said, is she seriously for real? All this crap about “human rights” – she forgoes her rights the moment she set foot on British soil loaded with narcotics.

    YOUR country? Bloody nationalists, always thinking they can boss everybody around. It’s my country, too, and I say she can stay. Why should you get to decide? All of us British-based posters can vote on it, if you want.

    As for laws, I care far more for morality than I do for legality. Thus, if she is lesbian, she should stay. Nobody should ever forgo their rights when they commit a crime. What right does any country have to enforce its will on people? If people are going to be kidnapped and held against their will be the state, the absolute least the state can do is to make sure that as many of their victim’s rights as possible remain intact.

  22. Mihangel apYrs 24 Jul 2009, 10:09am

    Pumpkin Pie
    she didn’t come here for asylum, to get away from the bigotry that pervades Jamaica, she came here to smuggle in drugs.

    If she had used the drug route as a way out of jamaica she could have confessed all when she arrived: she chose not to.

    I do feel sorry for her, but there are many more deserving cases that don’t get the publicity and that don’t make it seem as though our sexuality is somthing we can switch on when we want to.

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