Katy Perry has hit back at lesbian singer Beth Ditto who said that Perry was offensive to gay culture. Perry called Ditto’s remarks “tacky”.

Last week Ditto said “She’s just riding on the backs of our culture without having to pay any of the dues and not being actually lesbian or anything at all. She’s on the cover of a f—–g gay magazine”Katy Perry has hit back at lesbian singer Beth Ditto who said that Perry was offensive to gay culture. Perry called Ditto’s remarks “tacky”.

In an interview with The London Paper Perry said:” “I heard that she said something about me. I don’t want to get into a slanging war with anybody, so I don’t want to say anything bad about her. But I’m not impressed.”

“I’ve learnt in the past year that one artist should never ­insult another artist’s music – it’s tacky.

Adding: “With me, it always comes back to bite me on the arse!”

Talking previously about her single to Stepping Out magazine Perry said: “I was with my boyfriend at the time, and I said to him ‘I’m not going to lie – If Scarlett Johansson walked into the room and wanted to make out with me, I would make out with her. I hope you’re okay with that?'”

But Ditto found her adoption of a faux-gay attitude phony, calling the song a “boner dyke anthem for straight girls who like to turn guys on by making out or, like, faking gay.”

“I hate Katy Perry [...] I’m so offended,” Ditto said, before stating she would like to start a “band feud” with the pop starlet.

Another Pery hit, ‘UR SO GAY’ mocks a former ‘metrosexual’ boyfriend of Perry’s with lyrics that one critic described as “schoolyard homophobia.”

“I hope you hang yourself with your H&M scarf

“While jacking off listening to Mozart

“You bitch and moan about LA

“You’re so gay and you don’t even like boys

“No you don’t even like, no you don’t even like, no you don’t even like boys

“You’re so gay and you don’t even like boys.”

The song infuriated outspoken activist Peter Tatchell, who said the song demeans gay people.

“I am sure Katy would get a critical reception if she expressed comparable sentiments in a song called ‘UR so black, Jewish or disabled.'”