Stephen Fry is supporting a campaign to encourage more men to seek help for mental health issues.

The broadcaster, who is openly gay, revealed three years ago he had lived with bipolar disorder all his life but was not diagnosed until the age of 37.

The campaign, by mental health charity Mind, is called Get It Off Your Chest,

Figures from the organisation show that 31 per cent of men would feel embarrassed about seeking help for mental distress, while the same number would talk to their family about feeling low, compared with almost half of women.

Speaking about his own battle with mental health issues, Fry said: “For so long I tried to get on with my life and career, somehow coping with the huge highs and lows I experienced.

“If I had felt able to get it off my chest when I was younger I could have got more of the support I needed.
Click here for more”Mind’s campaign will hopefully encourage men to speak out more – stumbling through and hiding behind a front of bravado doesn’t solve anything. Seek professional help when you need it – and support Mind to get better help and services out there.”

In a BBC documentary broadcast in 2006, the veteran presenter revealed he had seriously considered taking his own life at one of his lowest points.

It is estimated that four million people in the UK suffer from bipolar disorder, with up to a quarter attempting suicide at some point in their lives.

Last month, Fry offered his thoughts on gay marriage, saying it didn’t matter what it was called.

Speaking from California, he said: “If people want to reserve marriage for a man-woman thing then fine, call it something else.”

He continued: “A bonding, a uniting, a legal yoking – that’s fine. Yoking is a lovely word. Yoked together…”

The presenter and his partner Daniel Cohen have been together for more than ten years.