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THT marks 25th anniversary of blood test with HIV warning

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  1. I’m not surprised the number of us that think we will never get it, and do it with out protection thinking it will be fine this once is scary I for one have done it with out protection. I think its the awareness among lots of things that is at an all time low. the fear needs to be put back into people about aids.

    I watched OAF USA the other day and they have 3 characters that are positive and they show them look healthy and fine. how is that helpful.

  2. Sod the warning. A hard-hitting HIV campaign wouldn’t go amiss fellas! For Chrissakes, you pocketed the Pan-London HIV Prevention Budget but what do you have to show for it? More PEP ads stuffed down our throats. Like we haven’t got the message by now? Sheesh. PEP is everywhere and now gay men are starting to look at it as a moprning-after pill!! How about something along the lines of encouraging us all how NOT to put ourselves in the position of needing PEP in the first place!! It ain’t rocket science, or do you guys have targets to hit for your big pharma co-funders?

  3. PEP has a role to play, but overkill is having the effect of promoting the management of sexual risk-taking. With no proven efficacy, THT is playing with fire by all out promotion of PEP at the expense of any other form of HIV prevention campaigning.

  4. It is time people started speaking out about Pep. I had a friend who thought it was worth having sex all weekend long once a month knowing he could go to your clap clinic on Monday morning for Pep treatment. Guess what? He tested positive for hiv in January.
    I can see why there has been an outcry about the new telly ads for the morning after pill. Just like Pep, it will increase promiscuous and unsafe sex and cause more damage than it claims to prevent.
    Why is the gay press not covering the other side of Pep? The incidence for accidental exposure to hiv are isolated one-off cases, but guys I know who deliberately have unsafe sex have had multiple courses of Pep and they are constantly sick, probably from the effects of the drug which destroys the immune system, just like Aids itself.
    We need to balance Pep with hard hitting hiv campaigns to put the message across that Pep is an Aids drug of last resort, as it was originally intended, and is not on tap for gay men with an inbuilt self-destruct mechanism. Isn’t that frigging obvious?!

  5. Paul Halsall 30 Jul 2009, 4:31pm

    What is wrong in the UK is the amount of stigma directed at HIV+ people by other gay people, and even by other people with HIV.

    Well I am HIV+, my family knows, all my friends know, and so do most of my neighbours (and I live on a [very nice] council estate in Radcliffe, Greater Manchester).

    I don’t think scaring people will work. People just don’t died of HIV in a few years. I can tell people, though, that even with a zero viral load, the meds can wear you down, and after many years you just feel so damned tired.

    But as long as this stigma remains people will refuse to get tested because they don’t want to be a member of a stigmatised group. When such people do get tested, they often seem to hate themselves, and either refuse to tell partners or go into a kind of “shock” and withdraw from the world.

    We need a balanced approach. HIV is not the immediate death sentence it once seemed, but it’s still something you don’t want to have. Until we limit stigma, there is no campaign that will be successful.

    I, at least, hope to contribute, by being quite open about it.

  6. Paul Halsall 30 Jul 2009, 4:40pm

    The thing is…

    What is wrong in the UK is the amount of stigma directed at HIV+ people by other gay people, and even by other people with HIV.

    Well I am HIV+, my family knows, all my friends know, and so do most of my neighbours (and I live on a [very nice] council estate in Radcliffe, Greater Manchester).

    I don’t think scaring people will work. People just don’t died of HIV in a few years. I can tell people, though, that even with a zero viral load, the meds can wear you down, and after many years you just feel so damned tired.

    But as long as this stigma remains people will refuse to get tested because they don’t want to be a member of a stigmatised group. When such people do get tested, they often seem to hate themselves, and either refuse to tell partners or go into a kind of “shock” and withdraw from the world.

    We need a balanced approach. HIV is not the immediate death sentence it once seemed, but it’s still something you don’t want to have. Until we limit stigma, there is no campaign that will be successful.

    I, at least, hope to contribute, by being quite open about it.

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