Enter your email address to receive our daily LGBT news roundup

You're free to unsubscribe at any time.

Chris Moyles breached broadcasting rules in “homophobic” imitation of gay singer Will Young

Post your comment

Comments on this article are now closed.

Reader comments

  1. Robert, ex-pat Brit 23 Mar 2009, 1:20pm

    In my book, he remains the bully of 2009. This is downright blatant homophobia. How would he like it if a gay DJ ridiculed Moyles’ weight or called him ugly and typical of many straight people? The man is clearly ignorant, bigoted and a total jackass.

  2. For his next trick Moyles could imitate Trevor McDonald using an “amusing” stereotypical “black” voice.

    Or he could do Dev Patel with his own “hilarious” interpretation of a Pakistani/Indian accent?

    But that would get him sacked on the spot wouldn’t it?

  3. Just as I was starting to think Christopher Biggins was right about cutting people some slack with gay-based humour, along comes Moyles and reminds me why we don’t tolerate this type of crap.
    He has responsibility as the self-appointed No.1 DJ on Britain’s No.1 youth radio station to set an example to the next generation, and that example appears to be ‘it’s fine to take the piss out of gay people in the most pejorative way you can so long as you can hide behind your gay assistant and the BBC when the accusations start flying’.

  4. Ivan, brilliant comment! 100% correct. If cocky show-off Christopher Moyles dared to exaggerate or ridicule the Blackness or Asianness of Trevor McDonald or Dev Patel he would indeed be immediately sacked.

    People just don’t get it, do they? Christopher Moyles deserved his Bully of the Year Award.

    I was shocked the other day when a straight female friend of mine said she liked that other ignorant bully Richard Littlejohn. I said, “No, XXXXXX. Richard Littlejohn is dangerous.” She said, “Ooooo, but I think he’s funny!”

    Some people aren’t prepared to work their brains and question whether these bullies are causing others to suffer.

  5. When are the BBC going to stop protecting him? They have sacked other people for much less than that and he keeps doing it and they keep justifying it.

    or is it because gay doesn’t count (which would be sadly ironic considering how many gay people seem to be working at the Beeb?

  6. Aren’t we all getting a bit too touchy on this? This does the gay stereotype of being highly strung. Calm down boys and girls. The guy is just an idiot and not very funny. The best thing is to not listen, then, hopefully he might be removed.

    If these type of comments are banned, then we will not be able to say Chris Moyles is a fat, unfunny f**k with a fat, spotty a**e, won’t we? I suppose this comment will be banned.

    When will the BBC stop protecting their “chosen ones”? If you are in the inner circle you are untouchable, it seems. “Give us more license fee or the children’s programmes get it!”

  7. Good, now maybe Ofcom can uphold the same ruling against Mathew Horne’s offensive news reporter character (The Horne & Corden Show) and Al Murray’s gay nazi character (Al Murray’s Multiple Personality Disorder). They’re all lazy, sickening, offensive stereotypes left over from a bygone era of comedy.

  8. Quite right, Ivan. I’m pleased about this judgement. It’s not that we can’t take a joke, it’s that Moyles, in my opinion, says these things to appeal to the homophobic/ignorant listeners who then go out and shout abuse at LGBT people in the street because it’s seen as OK and funny – after all, we only exist as objects to ridicule, right? Whether it’s malice or misjudgement, no-one should be allowed to denigrate someone because of who they are.

  9. Someone put him in touch with Christopher Biggins – they could get together and have a bit of a moan over a cappuccino.

  10. The BBC will never get rid of Chris Moyles… reason being – he’s brought in thousands of new listeners. Though Moyles will also never be out of a job, because as soon as he gets sacked from the BBC then there are going to be loads of other radio stations that will try and snap him up.

    His outrageousness though is just part and parcel of who he is and how he persieves himself on the radio. I laugh many times when he takes the mick out of things. A few years back – when I was at college – one of the jingles used had the ending line of “from 4 it’s Scott Mills and he is really …” then it had a blank space for everyone to obviously guess the missing word, which was obviously “gay” and in the sound clip I got from it, Chris is shouting “gay… gay… gay!”

    I don’t find it a problem to be honest, I believe he just seems to take the mick but in his own way. The same with some people like “knock, knock” jokes and others prefer more “ruder” jokes.

    Though if you don’t like him… don’t listen. There’s always radio 2, 3, 4, Heart, Magic, Galaxy… and the list goes on. :)

  11. Complain now 23 Mar 2009, 3:04pm

    Make a complaint

    Phone: 03700 100 222*

    I just did – the more who complain the better

  12. My take on Chris Moyles is that he based his act on a mixture of Chris Evans’ earlier career (from which he borrowed all the hubris with none of the wit) and an unintentional co-opting of Alan Partridge in his habit of airing his personal grudges over the airwaves without any decernable irony. I took an instant dislike to him.
    He uses Aled as a shield from behind which he churns out homophobic claptrap while constantly reminding us “I can’t be a homophobe, because my sidekick is gay”.
    Given that Aled is the butt of so many jokes, that’s about as convincing as saying “I can’t be a racist because I hire black people to clean my lavatory”.
    He irritates me, perhaps he’s just one of those ‘Marmite’ personalities that you either love or loathe, but if his jibes were directed at ethnic stereotypes he would have been sacked a long time ago.

  13. Glenn Fairclough 23 Mar 2009, 3:20pm

    This guy is a law to himself, he must recognise that his behaviour can affect other people, and that he possess the ‘power’ to repesent people positively and negatively. If people feel its ok to presume and to deride gay men or lesbians stereo types without thinking of a consequence they should be told of their mistake.

  14. Bud Burgoon-Clark 23 Mar 2009, 3:39pm

    Ugly little bugger, isn’t he? Bet he’s a closeted “cubbie.” You have him; we have Rush Lame-Balls. My sympathies!

    Cheers,

    Bud Burgoon-Clark
    San Diego CA USA

  15. Ian Laughlin 23 Mar 2009, 3:40pm

    There is a lengthy article in the March 2009 issue of Gay Times (now GT Magazine) about the BBC and homophobia. Although it has somehow managed to get a reputation amongst Daily Mail readers for being “left wing” the fact of the matter is that the BBC has always upheld the establishment – this dates back to 1926 when Lord Reith boasted about the early BBC’s role in breaking the General Strike. As anyone in their 50′s or over will recall, the BBC wouldn’t touch young people’s music for years. You had to listen to overseas radio stations such as AFN or Radio Luxembourg, or later, the offshore pirate radio stations like Radio Caroline, Radio City and so on, to hear pop music. The same was true of underground and black music which was catered for in the 1970′s and 1980′s on land-based pirates or the newly legal ILR stations. On television, it was ITV that won many of the awards for progressive broadcasting, that brought us programmes such as the Naked Civil Servant, or the first ever attempt at a gay magazine programme (London Weekend Television’s Gay Life in 1980-1). Channel Four and Sianel 4 Cymru started in 1982 and were the first to cater for disabled groups, ethnic minorities, Welsh speakers, as well as gay and lesbian audiences.

    The Stonewall group reported in 2007 in their “Tuned Out” survey that the BBC remained behind its competitors in the fair representation of gay and lesbian people. They concluded that in the small number of cases where LGBT people were covered by the BBC the coverage was overwhelmingly negative. (Generally, the pattern is true of a number of issues. The Stop the War Coalition for example, reported in 2003 that the BBC always preferenced the government position over those of protest groups – again to the surprise of many people who considered the BBC to be unduly left wing).

    3Sixty Magazine this month (March 2008) features a column by one of Mr Moyles’ fellow Radio 1 presenters, who is gay, claims that the presenter’s comments are ironic and that he is not homophobic. I suspect that many gay schoolchildren whose classmates listen to Moyles on a daily basis and parrot his banter, might have a different opinion.

  16. Mmm so lets get this right. Ross and Brand make sexual and offesive fun of Mr Sache and get a slap on the wristy(!) Moyles makes homophobic fun of Will Young and gets a similar smack. Carol Thatcher used the Golly word off air and got sacked…..?

  17. When Ofcom come out with lines such as “Ofcom took account of the fact that Chris Moyles is a well-known and influential presenter and that many listeners are familiar with his style and humour,” there is an implicit suggestion that as Moyles is ‘known’ to be homophobic, then that is alright. Ofcom should be ashamed and he should be strongly reprimanded or have a period of suspension. No more of this softly-softly treatment.

  18. If the only way you can get listeners is by being offensive then give up! I work on a community radio station and would never lower myself to be as abusive as Moyles is. Give me Terry Wogan any day, the man has more class in his little finger than Moyles has in his whole body! The man is overrated and it’s a shame they didn’t leave him behind when he did his mountain trek.

    That said as he has a gay producer, at least used to he should grow some balls and tell Moyles when he over stepped the mark instead of been so damn soft!

  19. Mike – at least with Ross and Brand they were both suspended for 3 months without pay and Brand left of his own accord. They also apologised on air. I think that was a proportionate response.
    Moyles hasn’t even been properly reprimanded beyond “If you do that again you’ll leave us no choice but to ask you nicely not to do that again.” Hardly seems right considering he has previous form.

  20. BBC Values

    Values are the standards which people across the BBC share. They represent the things we cherish and aspire to, they guide our day to day decisions and shape our individual and collective behaviour.
    Our values are:
    Trust: Trust is the foundation of the BBC, we are independent, impartial and honest.
    Audiences: Audiences are at the heart of everything we do.
    Quality: We take pride in delivering quality and value for money.
    Creativity: Creativity is the lifeblood of our organisation.
    Respect: We respect each other and celebrate our diversity so that everyone can give their best.
    Collaboration: Great things happen when we work together.

  21. Our equal opportunities statement
    The BBC is committed to promoting equal opportunities for all, irrespective of colour, race, religion or belief, ethnic or national origins, gender, marital/civil partnership status, sexuality, disability or age.
    The BBC is committed to reflecting the diversity of the UK and to making its services accessible to all. This applies both to our output and to the people who work here.

  22. Equality Impact Assessments
    The purpose of an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA) is to make sure that, when carrying out its public functions (or implementing policies and practices related to those functions), the BBC does not unlawfully discriminate against any of its audiences or licence fee payers and that, where possible, it promotes equality. It is a way to make sure that individuals and teams think carefully about the likely impact of their work and take action to improve strategies, policies and projects, where appropriate.

  23. The BBC’s commitment
    Diversity for the BBC is a creative opportunity to engage the totality of the UK audience. That includes diverse communities of interest, as well as gender, age, ethnicity, religion and faith, social background, sexual orientation, political affiliation and so on.
    Delivering on our commitment to equal opportunities and diversity is important to the BBC for a number of reasons. For example, the audiences that we serve are increasingly diverse. The BBC is also a public service broadcaster funded by a licence fee paid by all sections of UK society.
    1) The BBC is committed to reflecting the diversity of the UK audience in its workforce, as well as in its output on TV, on radio and online.
    2) The BBC also has a number of legal obligations to comply with current legislation, for example around the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA).
    3) The BBC has set itself workforce targets. These are currently under review by the Diversity Board, which is chaired by the BBC Director-General.

  24. “Diversity is not about meeting targets, it is a creative opportunity for the BBC to engage the totality of the UK audience.”
    Andrea Callender, Head of Diversity at the BBC

  25. Oh for pity’s sake, will the PC Brigade get a life! Everything these days seems to offend someone somewhere, Moyles’ imitation didnt offend me and im sure it wouldnt have offended Will Young either. There are bigger problems in this world! Get some perspective!

  26. david Tran 24 Mar 2009, 5:13am

    Do people actually find that even funny? It’s so crude. His sense of humour caters to the lowest common denominator of those not intelligent enough to have higher standards.

  27. Glenn Fairclough 24 Mar 2009, 9:09am

    There are bigger perspectives … very true… but if your are a child who gets bullied by someone who feels empowered by his remarks and representation of being gay, i guess that is the big perspective to them.

  28. Glenn Fairclough 24 Mar 2009, 9:16am

    Oh and mr bbc… i believe the London Metropolitian Police have policies to rid them of institutional racism; which appears to be ignored by some of its staff… as recently reported in the Times.

  29. seriously you all need to grow up and if chris moyles is all u have to worry about then lucky you. humor is humor the world over. if chris or anyone else that makes jokes of of the cuff comments in the same way that he does were actually a homophobic they wouldnt be broadcaasting it. he also makes jokes about certain counties or areas of the uk ir the world big woop if u dont like someones humor dont be so lazy and reach over and turn of the radio.

  30. Simon Murphy 27 Mar 2009, 1:37pm

    ~27 – Stu – you say:

    “Oh for pity’s sake, will the PC Brigade get a life! Everything these days seems to offend someone somewhere, Moyles’ imitation didnt offend me and im sure it wouldnt have offended Will Young either. There are bigger problems in this world! Get some perspective!”

    I think it’s you who is missing the perspective here. Can you not sense a homophobic double standard in sacking Carol Thatcher for using the word ‘Golliwog’ off camera (as that is ‘racist’) but allowing Chris MOyles to repeatedly mock a section of the license payers because he thinks it’s funny.

    Why is racism unacceptable but lazy homophobia tolerated.

  31. Simon Murphy 27 Mar 2009, 2:04pm

    #29 – Pete.

    I am old enough not to be affected by Chris Moyles’ homophobia. But considering we live in a country where teenagers and young people use the word ‘gay’ as a synonym for ‘crap’ or ‘rubbish’ and that this viewpoint is reinforced by Chris Moyles and the BBC I know that if I was 16 and in the closet Chris Moyles’ ‘irony’ / homophobia would probably be very distressing.

These comments are un-moderated and do not necessarily represent the views of PinkNews.co.uk. If you believe that a comment is inappropriate or libellous, please contact us.

Top commenters this week

Latest stories

See all