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Lib Dems: ‘Tories must clarify whether they plan to ally with homophobes’

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  1. Simon Murphy 17 Mar 2009, 4:04pm

    Which one of the Kaczynski brothers is the closetted homosexual – is it the president or the former PM?

  2. Kevin Peel 17 Mar 2009, 5:16pm

    The tories in Europe are even more of a joke than the ones in the UK. Over there where they think no one is looking their true colours as the same old nasty right wing party come out. A message for the upcoming european elections – vote tory and you might aswell be voting BNP. Vote Labour for progress.

  3. I just hope the Tories don’t win the next elections…

  4. Vulpus_rex 17 Mar 2009, 5:47pm

    Blah, blah, blah, evil tories, blah, blah, blah Margaret Thatcher, more of the same stupid, irrelevant smear at any opportunity.

    Sad student grant types stuck in their student union of the 1980s too moronically stupid to see what a catastrophe Gordon Brown is.

    What is it with these blinkered turkeys who want more sleazy incompetence from new labour?

  5. Justin Hinchcliffe 17 Mar 2009, 6:12pm

    I wouldn’t worry too much about it. David Cameron has already said the Conservatives will not sit with oddballs or extremists. Let’s calm down and see what happens. This story is pure mischief making by the Lib Dems and would never have been published under Tony Grew’s editorship! (-:

  6. Douglas Thomson 17 Mar 2009, 8:36pm

    “David Cameron has already said the Conservatives will not sit with oddballs or extremists”

    I don’t see how he will form this new grouping without the PiS (Law and Justice) party. Cameron might say he won’t join with PiS – he hasn’t laid out a strategy to form a viable group without PiS.

    With their current lead, balanced out for the different European regions, the Tories are heading for over 30 seats in the European Parliament come June. Cameron needs to lay out exactly who his partners will be before the 4th June elections so that people who want to vote Tory will know exactly who they’re voting for to represent them in Brussels for the next five years. He can’t say that it’s something they’ll discuss after the elections.

  7. @Justin

    Douglas is right. Voting for the Conservatives at the European elections is buying a pig in a poke.

    David Cameron has promised to take the Tories out of the European People’s Party in the European parliament because the EPP is pro-European.

    This leaves him with three choices:

    1) Sit on their own at the back. However, because they are no longer part of a pan-European grouping, they get no money to run their operation. This option is out of the question as they cannot afford it.

    2) Form a group that will be eligible for finance by forming a new grouping with patries from at least six other nations. However, the only way he can do this is join with a collection of oddball religious, facist and anti-European parties that no-one else wants to sit with; or

    3) Welch on his promise, enrage the swivel-eyed right wing euro-sceptics within his party and risk schism.

    @Simon

    I think the question is which one of the two goes on top :-)

  8. Justin Hinchcliffe 17 Mar 2009, 11:43pm

    Personally, as a Pro-European Conservative, I — and most of our MEPs – would have preferred to have stayed with our friends in the EPP. That said, most Conservatives in the UK are Euro-sceptic (note this is very different from withdrawing from the EU itself, as UKIP would). I recognise, though, David Cameron was meeting a key manifesto pledge to withdraw from the EPP. This is a very complex issue and one that does not command the attention of the voting public (be they gay or straight). Far more important than where we sit in the Parliament, is how our MEPs vote. To date, Conservative members have a very good record in standing up for British interests. I’m particularly proud of two of London’s Conservative MEPS, John Bowis and Charles Tannock, who have been at the forefront of getting the Parliament and Commission to oppose the dreadful entry restrictions on HIV people entering the States (see http://www.pinknews.co.uk/news/articles/2005-6371.html), on providing HIV medication to eastern European countries as a pre-condition for EU membership and for opposing anti-gay legislation in many, many countries across the globe.
    David Cameron is, as I understand it, in discussion with many moderate centre-right parties. At this stage it is premature to speculate. Let’s wait and see what happens. The Conservative Party, under David Cameron, is a modern progress force and I look forward to beating Labour and their Lib Dem lapdogs in June’s elections.

  9. Justin Hinchcliffe 17 Mar 2009, 11:48pm

    Personally, as a Pro-European Conservative, I — and most of our MEPs – would have preferred to have stayed with our friends in the EPP. That said, most Conservatives in the UK are Euro-sceptic (note this is very different from withdrawing from the EU itself, as UKIP would). I recognise, though, David Cameron was meeting a key manifesto pledge to withdraw from the EPP. This is a very complex issue and one that does not command the attention of the voting public. Far more important than where we sit in the Parliament, is how our MEPs vote. To date, Conservative members have a very good record in standing up for British interests. I particularly proud of two of London’s Conservative MEPS, John Bowis and Charles Tannock, who have been at the forefront of getting the Parliament and Commission to oppose the dreadful entry restrictions on HIV people entering the States (see http://www.pinknews.co.uk/news/articles/2005-6371.html), on providing HIV medication to eastern European countries as a pre-condition for EU membership and for opposing anti-gay legislation in many, many countries across the globe.

    David Cameron is, as I understand it, in discussion with many moderate centre-right parties. At this stage it is premature to speculate on what might or might not happen. The Conservative Party, under David Cameron, is a modern progress force and we look forward to beating Labour and their Lib Dem lapdogs in June’s elections.

  10. Sister Mary Clarence 18 Mar 2009, 12:54am

    To be honest I’m a bit more concerned about what they will be doing here. The crisis New Labour has dropped us in and how we get out of it is going to be the burning issue for the next government’s term.

    We’re likely to see a lot of countries putting national interests ahead of Europe while they stabilise their economies, lest they be in the same situation as the UK, refinancing their home economies only to see tax payers cash haemorrhaging overseas.

    Maybe the Lib Dems have got a policy on that …. oop, sorry, silly me!

  11. What do you expect from the Conservatives? They’re the kind of people who put their own wallets ahead of any kind of moral or civil rights.

    Why is Britain plagued with these people. The Polish Law and Order party and the Tories deserve each other.

  12. Sister Mary Clarence 18 Mar 2009, 3:09am

    I take it you haven’t been following the news for the last 10 years then David. If anyone has been looking to fill their own pockets of late its New Labour.

    Lord Taylor of Blackburn, Lord Truscott, Lord Snape and Lord Moonie are a case in point, not to mention dear old Mandie.

    I’ve lost count of the number of them that have been caught with their hands in the till over donations, failing to count them, overlooking them, forgetting the name of the donor, bit busy with work an’ all, but were going to let us know.

    We’ve had that lunatic Livingston in City Hall robbing us blind for the best party of a decade and dear old Tessa Jowell (in charge of the Olympics overspend debacle) failing to notice her swindling spiv husband quietly paying off a mortgage that represents a lifetime salary to many people.

    and you question the morals of the Conservatives ….

  13. Sister Mary Clarence you can’t blame labour for the economy that’s a world issues and its f—-d we truly are f—-d this would have happened no matter what party was in power, I for one think labour the best for this current issues. Cameron is to experienced and where the f–k did he come from

  14. Abba – your comment represents a triumph of the Labour party spin machine and the pro-government bias of the BBC.

    The banking crisis in the UK is a direct result of Gordon Brown’s failure to regulate the financial services industry properly.

    Northern Rock and HBOS failed because they loaned far too much money to people who could not afford to pay it back – tell me what that has that got to do with America or the rest of the world?

    The country is hocked up to its eyeballs because again the useless Brown sold off our gold reserves and pissed the revenue into the wind, as he did with all the bumper tax revenues over the past 12 years – spent on crap. Again you tell me what this has got to do with anyone but Gordon Brown?

    All his inept incompetent decision making I think you’ll find.

  15. Abba – your comment represents a sad triumph of the Labour party spin machine and the pro-government bias of the BBC.

    Northern Rock, RBS and HBOS failed because they loaned too much money to people who could not afford to pay it back.

    The banks were able to do this as the useless Gordon Brown failed to regulate the banking industry properly – tell me, what has this got to do with America or the rest of the world?

    The country is now hocked up to its eyeballs as instead if putting something aside for hard times, Brown pissed almost a trillion pounds of bumper tax revenue on crap – again please tell me what this has got to do with the rest of the world?

    Gordon brown is, and has been a disaster for this country.

  16. Now is when the Tory party needs to demonstrate whether it will be an inclusive party or not. It still has a lot of old baggage to jetison, if we are to feel safe with them in the driving seat. We could be ‘jumping out of the frying pay and into the fire’.

  17. Sister Mary Clarence 18 Mar 2009, 2:56pm

    Volpus – thank you, thank you thank you. At last someone on who is actually seeing through some of the misinformation.

    The British financial sector was at the heart of the global meltdown, it was us in the UK that were packaging up bad debt, bought from around the world and selling it on. Its not clear YET who exactly was the first to move heavily into this type of operation, but the British financial sector took it up and made it its own. It is a lie to suggest that this was the fault of the States and we are just being carried along by world events

    WE then contaminated other financial markets with the ‘product’ we were selling. That contamination then spread like a virus from market to market across the global.

    AIG is a perfect example of this. Now 80% owned by the US government after monumental losses, not through its US operation, but through small offices in Curzon Street here in London, where a group of stupid individuals though they had found the fountain of perpetual wealth, and gambled away the fortunes of the world’s largest insurance company.

    The British government were entirely complicit in this in failing to regulate, despite untold warnings, the risk that was being taken. Why was the financial sector so profitable? Did anyone really believe that we were so much better with money than the rest of the world? The government did not care as long as the sector bought sufficient income to finance the boom.

    Well the boom has well and truly come now and as we have seen unceasingly through this government’s time in office, its not their fault -everyone else’s fault but not their fault. It is pathetic. We need strong leadership now more than ever. Gordon Brown has shown he is not able to provide it, despite all his huffing and puffing. To be honest I’m not sure David Cameron is either, but given the choice Cameron is the only choice.

    Dear God, they didn’t see it coming!! Did they have the sound turned down every time an economist opened his (or her) mouth for the last five year.

    Please abba do not believe that the UK has not played a huge party in bringing down countless economies around the world.

    Almost every Labour government les left office with the British economy in tatters. Tony Blair’s legacy to this country and the world has been a global financial crisis

  18. Colm Howard-Lloyd 18 Mar 2009, 3:05pm

    Of course you can blame NuLabour for the economy.

    A lot of our current problems are indeed caused by international issues, however they are strongly exacerbated by the sorry state of our national economy.

    Under Chancellor Gordon Brown national debt has (with much of it cleverly concealed in PFI contracts) rockets upwards at a frightening rate and rises at £1520 a second. He also took us out of the Gold Standard – a mistake that has cost us dearly when commodities are still strong, committed us to Northern Rock, and dragged us into funding £1 trillion on public sector pensions.

    The economy is broken and its Labour that broke it.

    and what of these wonderful PFI contracts now? The point of them was to remove the need for the government to take the risk in a financing agreements. However because the economony is currently so dysfunctional the PFI contractors are unable to obtain finance. This is having to be provided by the government themselves. And the biggest insult in this? The PFI contracts are themselves inflexible so the goverment is still required to pay the contractor their 6% fee, on money it is having to lend itself, and only able to charge a much lower interest rate. The government is paying someone to service a debt it has all the risk on. The contractors are laughing all the way to the bank.

  19. The LibDem’s are fine ones to talk. In my home Town they are homophobicly arrogant that supporting the LGBT Community will only encourage the BNP, so arrogantly they do nothing.

  20. Sister Mary Clarence 18 Mar 2009, 4:14pm

    Worse still Colm the government is thinking about loaning investors the money for new PFI contracts in order that they go ahead, allowing them so make a small fortune for the next thrity years while the public sector labours under massive repayments.

    Two things here really:

    1) someone needs to look at the bigger picture and realise that direct government investment would save us all a small fortune and if legislative changes are needed to enable this, then they should get on and make them.
    2) can we actually afford at the present time for these projects to go ahead in the first play – public spending to ease recession works on the premise that good times are coming and the country will have the means to repay any borrowing. At the present time that is far from certain.

  21. Douglas Thomson 18 Mar 2009, 4:43pm

    @ Sister Mary Clarence.

    I think everyone is concerned what the Tories might do here in the UK. The economic crisis is obviously the big cauliflower. But to take a longer view, the next batch of MEPs will be in office until 2014. I don’t think the crisis is going to last that long so it would do well to think about who you want representing you in Brussels until then.

    I’d also say that this is an election for the European Parliament… who might be best at running the British economy is a very interesting question but not directly relevant to the election. You wouldn’t vote in your local council elections based upon your opinions on intellectual property protection, for example. (Well, you might. I wouldn’t.)

  22. Sister Mary Clarence 18 Mar 2009, 6:32pm

    Douglas, we will be suffering the legacy of the Brown/Blair depression well after 2014. How long do you imagine it is going to take to pay off a trillion+ in debt?

    I can’t believe that people are so upbeat about it. We have nothing whatsoever to trade on thwe world market to buy our way out of it and yet we are borrowing more and more and the current government, knowing full well the election is lost, is spending like someone told they’ve only got a week to live.

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