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14 December 2008

  • 14th December 2008

    Film Review: Inkheart

    Helen Mirren stars as “Elinor” in Inkheart

    3:20 PM — As with buses, so with films – you wait ages for a movie with a certain basic premise, then two come along at once. Be it alien invasion movies Independence Day and Mars Attacks! back in 1996 or asteroid strike flicks Armageddon and Deep Impact in 1998, or even the ultimate double-whammy of Fail Safe and Dr Strangelove back in 1964 (both based on the very same book), the history of cinema is littered with similar ideas hitting the big screen at around the same time. It's still rare, however, for two movies with such similar basic ideas at their heart to come out in the same month – but with Inkheart out this week and Disney's Bedtime Stories out on Boxing Day, that's precisely what's happened: two children's films about men who can – quite literally – bring stories to life.

  • Film Review: Madagascar – Escape 2 Africa

    The cast of Madagascar Escape 2 Africa

    3:16 PM — In 2005, Madagascar ambled into our cinemas as just one of countless computer-animated kids' films featuring talking animals getting into scrapes. It's tale of a bunch of New York zoo animals who end up having to fend for themselves in the jungles of Africa, following the Shrek mould of chucking in movie references in an attempt to appeal to adult audiences, and on the surface had little to make it stand out amidst the seemingly never-ending line of similar talking animal animations that the last decade has brought us. Yet somehow, something clicked. It wasn't a classic, certainly, but something about the ninja-style penguins, or perhaps the talented voice cast – principally Ben Stiller, Chris Rock, David Schwimmer, Jada Pinkett Smith and Sacha Baron Cohen – helped it to rise above the herd.

  • Film Review: Hamlet 2

    Steve Coogan and Elisabeth Shue star in Hamlet 2

    3:12 PM — There was a time during the mid to late 90s that Steve Coogan was almost unanimously regarded as Britain's best comedian. He came from a strong troupe of comics, first coming to the public's attention via the cult Radio 4 satirical series On The Hour - that also launched the careers of the likes of master satirists Chris Morris and Armando Iannucci as well as Jerry Springer: The Opera writer Stuart Lee and his erstwhile comedy partner Richard Herring. First broadcast in 1991-2, it was On The Hour that saw the first appearance of the comedy character with whom Coogan will forever be associated – the Terry Wogan-inspired presenter Alan Partridge.

  • Rufus Wainwright not a gay marriage supporter but criticises Prop 8 15

    Rufus Wainwright (promotional photograph)

    3:05 PM — Gay star Rufus Wainwright reveals that he's not a gay marriage supporter, but argues against Proposition 8. Singer, Wainwright, has told the New York Press"Oddly enough, I’m actually not a huge gay marriage supporter."

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