A DUP MP who caused outrage among Northern Ireland’s gay community with her homophobic outbursts may still face charges.

A spokesperson for the Police Service of Northern Ireland told PinkNews.co.uk that “inquiries are continuing” into whether Iris Robinson’s comments broke the law.

Two incidents have been reported to police.

Speaking to the Belfast Telegraph in June Mrs Robinson, who is married to the First Minister of Northern Ireland and is chair of the local Assembly’s health committee, said:

“I cannot think of anything more sickening than a child being abused. It is comparable to the act of homosexuality. I think they are all comparable. I feel totally repulsed by both.”

Gay rights activist Andrew Muir told police that Mrs Robinson has contravened the Article 9 of the Public Order (NI) Order 1987 by using threatening, abusive or insulting words which have the likelihood to stir up hatred and arouse fear.

More than 100 complaints were lodged with police after Mrs Robinson refused to apologise for an interview on Radio Ulster in June when she claimed that homosexuality is disgusting, loathsome, nauseating, wicked and vile and that gay people can be “cured.”

It is thought she is being investigated for a possible breach of the Public Order Act.

Speaking on The Nolan Show, she was asked to comment on a homophobic assault that took place in Newtownabbey.

Stephen Scott, 27, was attacked by a gang of youths and suffered head and leg injuries. The police called the incident homophobic in nature.

Mrs Robinson suggested that there are therapies to “cure” people of homosexuality.

She condemned the attack on Mr Scott but added:

“I have a very lovely psychiatrist who works with me in my offices and his Christian background is that he tries to help homosexuals trying to turn away from what they are engaged in.

“And I have met people who have turned around to become heterosexual.”

Mrs Robinson turned down an invitation from gay rights group Rainbow Project to meet with gay and lesbian people and hear about their experiences and concerns.

“I do not need to put my hand into the fire to know I will get burned,” she commented.

Her husband, First Minister Peter Robinson, has stood by his wife.

In an interview with BBC Northern Ireland in October he said:

“It wasn’t Iris Robinson who determined that homosexuality was an abomination, it was the Almighty.

“This is the Scriptures and it is a strange world indeed where somebody on the one hand talks about equality, but won’t allow Christians to have the equality, the right to speak, the right to express their views.”

The Office of the First Minister and Deputy First Minister is tasked with ensuring equality for gay people in Northern Ireland.

Mrs Robinson was voted Bigot of the Year at the Stonewall Awards earlier this month.