A pensioner who stabbed a man in the neck in a Manchester city centre attack has been jailed for seven years.

David Broady, 71, of Victoria Court, Victoria Square, Manchester, was sentenced today.

Last month he was found guilty of the manslaughter of Craig Douglas following a seven day trial.

At 7.30pm on 25th February Mr Douglas, 25, was stabbed on Canal Street, in the centre of the gay village in Manchester.

Police and ambulance crews attended and found Mr Douglas lying on the floor with a stab wound to his neck.

He was taken to the Manchester Royal Infirmary but died soon after his arrival. He was a father and stepfather.

A post-mortem examination later revealed he died of a single stab wound to the neck from a weapon about 6cm to 8cm in length.

Mr Douglas and a friend had earlier been drinking in a pub and had been asking people for cigarettes.

He asked Broady and his friend for a cigarette and when they refused and walked off, he followed them and a heated confrontation between Mr Douglas and Broady broke out.

Broady then lashed out as if trying to punch Mr Douglas who was then heard shouting: ‘What have you done to my neck?’

Broady and his friend ran off and although Mr Douglas tried to go after them, he collapsed. As he lay dying he pleaded with his friend to call for an ambulance.

Between that date and Broady’s arrest on March 2nd 2008, he telephoned his estranged wife and admitted he lashed out at Craig because he feared he was going to be beaten up. He later gave himself up to police.

Vinny Chadwick, Senior Investigating Officer in this case, said:

“This was a tragic case which started out as an argument and ended with the death of a young man.

“Broady admitted he was carrying a knife and he must have known the consequences of using that weapon – consequences that resulted in Craig’s death.

“I hope that today’s conclusion is of some comfort to the family and gives them closure.”

Chief Inspector Bob Lomas, from GMP’s North Manchester division, said: “What I want to stress about this case is that although the attack took place in the gay village, sexuality was not an issue and this was not a homophobic attack.

“The gay village is a very safe place to work and visit and we have an excellent relationship with the community and the businesses. This sort of tragic incident could have happened anywhere.

“However, this should not detract from the terrible loss that Craig’s family have suffered.”