The Prime Minister has set out a wide-ranging agenda for government in his speech to the Labour party conference in Manchester.

Gordon Brown told delegates that he is “serious about doing a serious job for all the people of this country,” and claimed that only Labour truly cares about equality.

He was introduced by his wife Sarah, who said she is so proud that “every day he is motivated to work for the interests of people all around the country,” and a video montage of Labour’s achievements, featuring testimonials from Democratic candidate for President of the United States Barack Obama and businessman Sir Alan Sugar.

In a confident speech lasting more than an hour, Mr Brown declared that “this will be the British century,” and unveiled new policies for a “global age.”

He also mounted a defence of Labour’s decade in office and accused the Tories of being untrustworthy.

“Fairness is in our DNA, it is who we are, it is what we are for, it is why Labour exists,” he said.

Mr Brown cited civil partnerships as an example of something that would not have come about under the Tories.

The Prime Minister also acknowledged mistakes over the abolition of the 10p rate of tax, and insisted he is on the side of “working families.”

He also told delegates that “our duty is to the whole country and not just the party,” a clear reference to calls for him to stand aside.

Mr Brown promised that one million more disadvantaged homes would be connected to the internet, announced a new victims commissioner, reform of benefits and free nursery places for every two year old in the country.

He also said that cancer patients would no longer have to pay for prescriptions.

The speech was well received by delegates, but it has not stopped some in the party calling for him to leave office.

It has been reported that members of the Cabinet have given Mr Brown nine months to turn around the party’s dire performance in opinion polls.