With Barack Obama limping across the finish line to secure the number of delegates needed to claim the Democratic nomination and despite her unexpected win in the South Dakota primary, all eyes are now on Hillary Clinton.

What’s her next move, many wonder, as she acknowledges Obama’s victory as far as delegates go but stops short of conceding the race.

And that Vice Presidential seat? She’s open, the New York Senator assures.

“It has been an honour to contest these primaries with him, just as it is an honour to call him my friend,” Clinton said, speaking to a crowd of supporters tonight from Baruch College in lower Manhattan.

She continued to lavish such praise on Obama that many expected the inevitable announcement that she’d be ending her bid for President.

In St. Paul, Minnesota, Obama prepped his victory address, ready to take to the stage and congratulate Clinton on a campaign well fought.

“Because of you, tonight I can stand here and say that I will be the Democratic nominee for the president of the United States of America,” Obama said.

But instead of allowing him his victory, Clinton went on to discuss why she’d be the better candidate to go toe to toe with John McCain in November.

In continuing to tout her skill set, she made it clear she has yet to play her last card.

According to the Times Online, many analysts suspect Clinton is dragging her heels in an attempt to court Obama into offering her the Vice President slot on the ticket.

And given the support she’s ammassed in this election, many argue she’s earned it.

Moments later, her campaign chair Terry McAuliffe introduced Clinton as the next President of the United States amid chants urging her to take the flight all the way to the DNC in Denver.

“In millions of quiet moments in thousands of places you asked yourself a simple question: who will be the strongest candidate?,” she asked the roaring crowd.

“Who will be ready to take charge of the White House and ready to be commander-in-chief? I often felt that each of your votes was a prayer for our nation … I am so proud we stayed the course together.”

Though many question whether the so named ‘dream ticket’ could actually rise out of the mud-slinging that’s shaped this race, some suggest it’s the only possible match up to beat McCain.

Perhaps aware of what she’d bring to the ticket, Clinton offered: “This has been a long campaign, and I will be making no decision tonight.”

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