A two thousand mile motor rally celebrating gay diversity will kick off in late June, the first race of its kind.

The inaugural Rainbow Rampage takes place from June 28th to July 4th, is a twist on a traditional motor rally and more akin to a giant gay road trip.

The rally downplays the racing aspect and is designed more to celebrate the cities that stretch along the race’s route.

The rally covers some 2300 miles across Europe and starts in Brighton before crossing the channel to the first rally pit stop: Paris.

From the French capital, rally drivers and passengers then make their way to other major European cities; Amsterdam, Hamburg, Berlin, Prague and Vienna.

The route has been designed along non-highway roads, enhancing the touristy aspect of the race.

The week-long adventure concludes in the Hungarian capital Budapest, arriving just in time for the city’s Gay Pride Parade, where all participants are invited to take part.

All those taking part also get to spend their last night of the rally in a luxury spa hotel in Budapest.

An American version of the race has also been organised and the week-long event takes place in September.

The US Rainbow Rampage takes advantage of that country’s abundant natural attractions.

Starting off in Seattle, contestants then drive to Crater Lake, South Lake Tahoe, Yosemite, Las Vegas, Joshua Tree National Park and in the penultimate city of Los Angeles.

The Rampage concludes in America’s gay capital, San Francisco where participants can join in the annual LoveFest.

Organisers of the Rainbow Rampage say that while they hope the race raises awareness of gay issues and sexuality, it is primarily designed for the participants to have a ball, describing it as “a fabulous expression of spirit.”

“We welcome participants of every color and stripe to represent the full spectrum of gay identities, personalities and style for the ultimate gay party,” said organiser Guy Zucker.

He expects up to 40 teams (of up to four people in each car) to participate in the respective European and American events.

While it is only voluntary for contestants to incorporate the charity programme with their race participation, organisers have already been approached by a few organisations.

“We are in touch with a few of them – all related to the gay community,” said Mr Zucker.

“We are still in the process of choosing the one that we will think can benefit the

most from this event.”

By keeping entry requirements to a minimum, organisers hope to attract a wide range of contestants.

“By staging two similar events with few entry rules – any road-legal vehicle may enter – there are bound to be a terrific variety of vehicles and drivers making each event completely unique.”

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