A survey in the United States conducted by the Barna Group between 2004 and now has found that both Christians and non-Christians have a ‘bad impression’ of Christianity.

The religion is also waning in popularity with a rapid increase in people describing themselves as ‘non-Christian’ since the same poll was conducted in 1996.

Surveying 440 Christians and the same amount of non-believers, nine out of ten non-Christians found Christians too “anti-homosexual.”

Almost the same amount viewed it as “hypocritical” and “judgmental.” Seventy-five percent thought Christianity was “too involved in politics.”

Of believers, 80% identified “anti-homosexual” as a negative adjective describing Christianity today.

One of the most frequent criticisms of young Christians, according to the Barna Group report “was that they believe the church has made homosexuality a “bigger sin” than anything else.

Moreover, they claim that the church has not helped them apply the biblical teaching on homosexuality to their friendships with gays and lesbians.

Hypocrisy was also a main concern with 52% of Christians aged 16-29 agreeing with 85% of non-believers that Christianity is “hypocritical – saying one thing doing another.”

Fifty percent identified their faith as “too involved in politics.” Forty-four percent found it “confusing.”

Overall, the Barna found that the younger generation is much more sceptical and critical of Christianity today, whether they are or are not believers.

Christianity’s ‘image problem’, as Time magazine describes it, is in need of a major overhaul.