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July 2007

  • 24th July 2007

    Gay.com parent company sheds 273 staff

    PlanetOut owns The Advocate, Gay.com, PlanetOut.com, Advocate.com, Out.com, OutTraveler.com and HIVPlusMag.com.

    12:19 PM — Troubled American gay media company PlanetOut has announced a 15% cut in its employees.Earlier this month the company closed its London office as part of a streamlining of business operations designed to reduce costs. The board announced last week that 273 staff will be made redundant.A company that invests the wealth of Microsoft founder Bill Gates has purchased a major stake in PlanetOut.

  • Homophobic judge under investigation

    he Spanish Federation of Gays, Lesbians, Transsexuals and Bisexuals said the case went against basic human rights.

    11:50 AM — A Spanish judge who ordered a mother to choose between her partner and her daughters, because "a homosexual environment threatened their education," is under investigation.The woman, from Murcia, south east Spain, was faced with the impossible choice after her husband discovered her in a compromising position with another woman.He filed for divorce and was awarded custody of the couple's two daughters, after 'proving' his wife is a lesbian.

  • Trans tax challenge trial begins 3

    Ms O'Donnabhain paid approximately $25,000 (£12,500) out-of-pocket for her care, including therapy, hormone treatment and surgery.

    11:12 AM — Rhiannon O'Donnabhain "lived in anguish" as a male, struggling with the sense that she was, in fact, a female.In 1996, she was diagnosed with gender identity disorder and undertook a course of professionally prescribed medical treatments that included her 2001 sex reassignment surgery.O'Donnabhain claimed the cost of her treatment as a deductible medical expense on her federal income tax return, but the Internal Revenue Service denied the claim.

  • 23rd July 2007

    Comment: Channel 4’s wasted opportunity 9

    Channel 4 deliberately, and cleverly, opened their series with The Last Gay Trial, which offers a poignant and beautifully executed portrayal of homophobia in the 50s and 60s.

    6:18 PM — "Thankfully, things are different now," my mum said to me after watching A Very British Sex Scandal, the first programme in Channel 4's series marking the 40th anniversary of the partial decriminalisation of homosexuality.On the one hand she is right - we can now enter into a civil partnership, we can insist upon equal rights in the provision of goods and services and dedicated teachers, who can offer vital support to isolated gay pupils, are no longer gagged by the destructive Section 28.

  • Australian laws “discriminate against gays”

    LGB couples are denied some basic financial and work-related entitlements.

    5:40 PM — An audit by the Australian National University has revealed that the federal system in the country is proving a barrier for gay equality.The Australian federal government is trailing behind some of its state and territory counterparts, where gay families are accorded the same rights as heterosexual ones.The inquiry considered the impact of legislative and policy frameworks, as well as social attitudes that affect the rights of gay families in Australia.

  • Senior Muslim doctor denies writing anti-gay letter 12

    Gay rights group Stonewall criticised Dr Siddiq's comments as proof that homophobia exists in certain pockets of the medical community.

    3:18 PM — A homophobic Muslim doctor is being disciplined for saying that homosexuals, "need the stick of law to put them on the right path" and that they deserve neither help nor pity.This Hippocratic slur comes from a doctor who is the President of the Islamic Medical Association, which claims to represent 99% of the UK Muslim community.The offending medic, Dr Muhammad Siddiq, wrote in a letter to doctor's magazine Pulse:

  • Home Secretary may consider gay hate crime law 3

    Ms Smith has impressed many MPs of all sides with her performance as Britain's first female Home Secretary.

    12:51 PM — Jacqui Smith, the Home Secretary, has told the House of Commons she may consider passing new laws creating an offence of homophobic hate crime.She was responding to a question from Labour MP Chris Bryant, who is gay. He drew attention to the murder of David Morley in October 2004.The 44-year old barman was set upon on London's South Bank, close to Parliament, by a gang of four people, one of them a teenage girl.

  • Extreme protest wins gay asylum seeker a stay in UK 28

    Iran is one of the six countries where homosexuality is punished with a death penalty.

    12:37 PM — An ayslum seeker who sewed shut his eyes and lips in protest at being returned to Iran has been granted leave to remain in the UK.Shahin Portofeh, 27, an gay Iranian national, was seeking asylum in Coventry, but he was deported from the UK after his application was rejected.Despite his protests that he would be persecuted in his home country because of his sexuality, he was sent back.

  • THT want to know about your sex life

    “Both of these surveys are vital as they help us develop and target our HIV and sexual health promotion work.“

    11:43 AM — Leading charity the Terrence Higgins Trust (THT) is appealing to PinkNews.co.uk readers to take part in this year's gay men's sex survey.This vital annual poll is the largest of its type in the world. Last year over 13,000 men took part, giving THT and scores of other organisations vital data.Sigma Research, a social research group specialising in the behavioural and policy aspects of HIV and sexual health, and the University of Portsmouth are launching the National Gay Men's Sex Survey today.

  • LGBT groups get UN recognition 1

    Canada and others argued that LGBT people should be heard at the UN.

    11:25 AM — The United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) has voted to accredit two gay rights organisations.Delegates came down in favour of allowing the Coalition gaie et lesbienne du Québec and the Swedish Federation for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Rights (RFSL) consultative status..22 countries voted in favour of both groups. Thirteen voted against the Quebec coalition and fourteen against the Swedish federation.

  • Out US general to speak against gay ban 5

    More than 11,000 service members have been discharged under 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell.'

    10:50 AM — Army Brigadier General Keith H. Kerr, Army Colonel Stewart Bornhoft, Navy Captain Joan E. Darrah (all retired) and five other former military officers will speak out against the US military's anti-gay 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' policy at a programme benefiting the Servicemembers Legal Defence Network (SLDN) in Chicago next month.General Kerr was one of three senior military officers - two generals and an admiral - to "come out" in the New York Times in December 2003.

  • Reggae star turns his back on homophobia 1

    Mr Banton became notorious for his 1992 song Boom Bye Bye which advocates shooting gay men in the head.

    10:10 AM — Reggae star Buju Banton has become the latest homophobic performer to renounce homophobia and condemn violence against lesbians and gay men.He has signed up to the Reggae Compassionate Act in a deal brokered with top reggae promoters and Stop Murder Music activists.His decision is in marked contrast to his attitude in October 2006, when two of his concerts in the US were cancelled after pressure from gay activists.

  • 20th July 2007

    Gay Tory makes Mayor of London shortlist 1

    Mr Boff announced a new policy yesterday. Londoners will have the right to draw up their own policies and have them voted on by fellow Londoners if he becomes mayor.

    5:57 PM — Andrew Boff has been selected as one of four candidates for the Conservative party nomination for Mayor of London.The 49-year-old IT consultant and publisher joins former Tory frontbencher and TV personality Boris Johnson on the list, which was chosen from over 40 hopefuls by a selection panel on Saturday.The other candidates are Kensington Chelsea councillors Warwick Lightfoot and Victoria Borwick.

  • Sexually transmitted disease cases continue to rise

    Dr Hughes said that the HPA is most concerned about young adults and gay men.

    5:57 PM — Officials at the Health Protection Agency have expressed concern that the number of new sexually transmitted infections treated at genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics in the UK continues to rise.The increase was most marked in gay men and younger people.Sexual health charity Terrence Higgins Trust has called for better sex education in schools to try to reverse the trend.

  • Homophobic slur against gay politician enrages GLAAD 2

    Mr McGreevey shot to international fame in 2004 when he declared at a press conference “I am a gay American.“

    4:08 PM — The Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation, a US group that monitors media representation, has protested against a cartoon lampooning former New Jersey Governor Jim McGreevey.The cartoon refers to the minor scandal surrounding the release of compromising photos of the current Miss New Jersey, Amy Polumbo. There were attempts to blackmail her over the photos.Mr McGreevey shot to international fame in 2004 when he declared at a press conference "I am a gay American."

  • Trans academic challenges Darwin’s evolution theories

    Dr Roughgarden asserts that the function of sex is mostly social, a position that has been heavily criticised by other evolutionary biologists.

    3:40 PM — The annual meeting of America's Lesbian and Gay Veterinary Medical Association has heard a damning critique of the sexual selection theories of Charles Darwin.Joan Roughgarden, a biologist at Stanford University, says that the accepted notion that male animals compete for mates, while the females choose males with care, is "locker room bravado projected onto animals."Sexual selection asserts that males want to have sex with as many females as possible to pass on their genes.

  • Scottish bishop’s threat over gay adoptions 1

    Adoption agencies have until December 2008 to apply the new regulations or face prosecution.

    3:08 PM — The Roman Catholic Bishop of Motherwell said yesterday that the Church in Scotland would close its biggest adoption agency rather than help same-sex couples to adopt children.Bishop Joseph Devine said that St Margaret's Catholic Adoption Agency in Glasgow would close rather than abide by the Sexual Orientation Regulations.Catholic agencies place around 40 of the 200 children adopted in Scotland every year.

  • Sperm donor stops lesbian parents taking their baby abroad 5

    One of the three High Court justices hearing the appeal dissented, saying the only relationship the father has with the child is that of a sperm donor.

    3:05 PM — A court in Dublin has ruled in favour of a man who wants to stop a lesbian couple leaving Ireland with their child. The man is the biological father of the 14-month-old baby.The High Court ruled that the child's birth mother may not holiday in her home country of Australia with the child and her partner.The lesbian couple have entered into a civil partnership in the UK and are considering moving to Australia permanently.

  • UN votes today on accreditation for gay rights groups 1

    ECOSOC promotes international economic and social co-operation and development.

    2:45 PM — The United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) is due to vote today on whether to accredit two non-governmental organisations (NGOs) who address human rights violations based on sexual orientation and gender identity.It is thought nine countries are going to vote against accrediting the groups.ECOSOC accreditation governs whether NGOs can attend UN meetings, submit written statements, make oral interventions, host panels and get access to UN buildings.

  • Analysis: The bishop, the youth worker and the tribunal 8

    Mr Reaney brought his claim under the Employment Equality (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2003, which make it unlawful to discriminate against employees or prospective employees (such as Mr Reaney) because they are gay.

    12:30 PM — This week saw a landmark victory for a gay youth worker against the might of the Anglican Church.An employment tribunal decided that Kevin Reaney, a gay man, had been discriminated against by the church on grounds of his sexual orientation.Mr Reaney brought his claim under the Employment Equality (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2003, which make it unlawful to discriminate against employees or prospective employees (such as Mr Reaney) because they are gay.

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